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50 years of Stanley Cup rings

While all NHL players hope to lift the Stanley Cup as a league champion, the one souvenir that stays with them is their championship ring. Each winning team gets to design its own ring, and the designs have evolved over time. A look at the past 50 years, which includes 48 ring designs (there were no rings in 1971 or 2005):

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

1998

1997

1996

1995

1994

1993

1992

1991

1990

1989

1988

1987

1986

1985

1984

1983

1982

1981

1980

1979

1978

1977

1976

1975

1974

1973

1972

1971

1970

1969

1968

1967

1966

1965

1964

1963

SOURCES: Montreal Canadiens, stanleycuprings.net, thechampionshiprings.com, ringsthatbling.com, therinkrat.com, totalprosports.com

Luke Knox/Globe staff

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