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Graphic: Landmarks of the Masters at Augusta National

Carved out of a 365-acre parcel of land that had once been a nursery -- and an indigo plantation before that -- Augusta National Golf Club opened in 1932, and the first Masters was held in 1934. It was initially called the Augusta National Invitation Tournament. Fortunately, that name didn't stick. These landmarks, some that date back long before the land became a golf course, definitely have.

Click the numbers to see the different landmarks

12
4
6
5
3
2
11
7
1
9
10
8

12. Amen Corner

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

In 1958, Massachusetts native Herbert Warren Wind, writing for Sports Illustrated, coined the term that would become famous. It describes a stretch that could decide the tournament: second shot to No. 11, the par-3 12th, and drive at No. 13.

4. Big Oak Tree

Al Tielemans/Getty Images

More introductions, reunions, and deals happen under this massive oak behind the clubhouse than anywhere else. It touches the 1850s, planted around the time when the clubhouse was built, and wire cables are used to help it keep its distinctive shape.

6. Butler Cabin

David Cannon/Getty Images

One of 10 cabins that sit on a circular drive to the left of the 10th tee near the Par-3 Course, Butler Cabin is where the winner slips on the green jacket for the CBS broadcast. It was built in 1964, 11 years after its neighbor, the Eisenhower Cabin.

5. Clubhouse

David Cannon/Getty Images

At the end of Magnolia Lane, the base barely visible from Washington Road, is what's considered the South's first cement residence. The iconic white structure -- a sterling replica serves as the winner's trophy -- was built in 1854 and has three floors, plus a square cupola on top.

3. Crow's Nest

Fred Vuich/Getty Images

Reserved only for the amateurs who have qualified for the Masters. Many choose to stay there at least one night, but the quarters can become cramped. It's roughly 30 feet by 40 feet, and partitions split it into space for five.

2. Founders Circle

David Cannon/Getty Images

Two plaques at the base of the flagpole that fronts the clubhouse honor the club's co-founders, Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Also included are two yellow flower outlines of the US, with smaller flagsticks planted in Augusta. Popular picture spot.

11. Hogan's Bridge

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

One of three named bridges on the golf course, it is located on No. 12, traveling over Rae's Creek. Named for Ben Hogan, who won the Masters twice (1951, 1953). Dedicated in 1958, it commemorates Hogan's then-record score of 274 in 1953.

7. Ike's Pond

Getty Images

At the suggestion of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who became a member in 1948 and President of the United States in 1953, a three-acre, man-made fishing hole was created in 1949 on the property's east side, on what would become the Par-3 course.

1. Magnolia Lane

Scott Halleran/Getty Images

The most famous -- and exclusive -- drive in golf starts by pulling off Washington Road at the club's "Members Only" entrance. Framed by towering magnolias, the road (first paved in 1947) travels past the security gate and ends at the clubhouse.

9. Nelson Bridge

Harry How/Getty Images

After teeing off No. 13, players take this footbridge back over Rae's Creek. Dedicated in 1958, it's named for two-time Masters champion Byron Nelson. Placed there because of Nelson's final-round exploits in 1937, when he birdied 12 and eagled 13.

10. Rae's Creek

Augusta National

Before spilling into the Savannah River, Rae's Creek winds through Augusta National, mainly impacting two holes. It makes its first appearance behind No. 11, then guards the green at the par-3 12th before snaking in front of the 13th tee.

8. Sarazen Bridge

Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

There's no better spot for this footbridge, which takes players across a pond toward the 15th green. It's where Gene Sarazen hit one of golf's greatest shots, holing his second for a double eagle in 1935, when he won. Dedicated in 1955.

Amen Corner

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

In 1958, Massachusetts native Herbert Warren Wind, writing for Sports Illustrated, coined the term that would become famous. It describes a stretch that could decide the tournament: second shot to No. 11, the par-3 12th, and drive at No. 13.

Big Oak Tree

Al Tielemans/Getty Images

More introductions, reunions, and deals happen under this massive oak behind the clubhouse than anywhere else. It touches the 1850s, planted around the time when the clubhouse was built, and wire cables are used to help it keep its distinctive shape.

Butler Cabin

David Cannon/Getty Images

One of 10 cabins that sit on a circular drive to the left of the 10th tee near the Par-3 Course, Butler Cabin is where the winner slips on the green jacket for the CBS broadcast. It was built in 1964, 11 years after its neighbor, the Eisenhower Cabin.

Clubhouse

David Cannon/Getty Images

At the end of Magnolia Lane, the base barely visible from Washington Road, is what's considered the South's first cement residence. The iconic white structure -- a sterling replica serves as the winner's trophy -- was built in 1854 and has three floors, plus a square cupola on top.

Crow's Nest

Fred Vuich/Getty Images

Reserved only for the amateurs who have qualified for the Masters. Many choose to stay there at least one night, but the quarters can become cramped. It's roughly 30 feet by 40 feet, and partitions split it into space for five.

Founders Circle

David Cannon/Getty Images

Two plaques at the base of the flagpole that fronts the clubhouse honor the club's co-founders, Bobby Jones and Clifford Roberts. Also included are two yellow flower outlines of the US, with smaller flagsticks planted in Augusta. Popular picture spot.

Hogan's Bridge

Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images

One of three named bridges on the golf course, it is located on No. 12, traveling over Rae's Creek. Named for Ben Hogan, who won the Masters twice (1951, 1953). Dedicated in 1958, it commemorates Hogan's then-record score of 274 in 1953.

Ike's Pond

Getty Images

At the suggestion of Dwight D. Eisenhower, who became a member in 1948 and President of the United States in 1953, a three-acre, man-made fishing hole was created in 1949 on the property's east side, on what would become the Par-3 course.

Magnolia Lane

Scott Halleran/Getty Images

The most famous -- and exclusive -- drive in golf starts by pulling off Washington Road at the club's "Members Only" entrance. Framed by towering magnolias, the road (first paved in 1947) travels past the security gate and ends at the clubhouse.

Nelson Bridge

Harry How/Getty Images

After teeing off No. 13, players take this footbridge back over Rae's Creek. Dedicated in 1958, it's named for two-time Masters champion Byron Nelson. Placed there because of Nelson's final-round exploits in 1937, when he birdied 12 and eagled 13.

Rae's Creek

Augusta National

Before spilling into the Savannah River, Rae's Creek winds through Augusta National, mainly impacting two holes. It makes its first appearance behind No. 11, then guards the green at the par-3 12th before snaking in front of the 13th tee.

Sarazen Bridge

Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

There's no better spot for this footbridge, which takes players across a pond toward the 15th green. It's where Gene Sarazen hit one of golf's greatest shots, holing his second for a double eagle in 1935, when he won. Dedicated in 1955.

SOURCES: Augusta National, Associated Press
Luke Knox, Michael Whitmer/Globe Staff

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