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In a season with too many big books, here are some of the biggest

gary clement for the boston globe

In a season with too many big books to count, here are some of the biggest.

BIGGEST SCREAM

“Doctor Sleep” by Stephen King (Scribner, Sept. 24, $30)

Thirty-six years later, Stephen King returns to the horrifying world of “The Shining,” arguably his most significant contribution to American culture and certainly among his most remunerative — the original has sold about a million copies to date.

BIGGEST PRIZE CONTENDER

“The Lowland” by Jhumpa Lahiri (Knopf, Sept. 24, $27.95)

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Lahiri’s first story collection, “Interpreter of Maladies,” won the Pulitzer Prize, but each of her books has sent critics into a rapturous swoon. Her forthcoming novel, set in the United States and Calcutta, has already amassed rave reviews.

BIGGEST NEW ENGLAND CONNECTION

“Dirty Love” by Andre Dubus III (W.W. Norton, Oct. 7, $25.95)

Dubus, too widely revered to be considered a local writer, has nevertheless become the literary ambassador of metropolitan Boston. His new novel, like his recent award-winning memoir, “Townie,” is populated by those struggling north of Boston.

BIGGEST HISTORY

“The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism” by Doris Kearns Goodwin (Simon and Schuster, Nov. 5, $40)

The woman New York Magazine has called America’s historian-in-chief tackles the troubles journalism brought upon the progressive wing of the Republican Party.

BIGGEST DOORSTOP

“The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown, Oct. 22, $30)

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Fans of Tartt’s classic thriller, “The Secret History,” will rejoice at the publication of her latest novel — at 784 pages, it’s 144 pages longer than her last whopper, “The Little Friend.”

THE SMALL

A selection of works for creative writing students, fanatical fiction fans, and those allergic to the bestsellers lists.

THE LITERARY AFFIRMATION

“A Prayer Journal” by Flannery O’Connor, edited by W.A. Sessions (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, Nov. 12, $18)

Our foremost Southern voice kept journals while in exile at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop. She asked God to make her a better writer. It worked.

THE SMALL PRESS BREAKOUT

“Even Though I Don’t Miss You” by Chelsea Martin (Hobart, Nov. 5, $11.95)

Young Martin got a reputation for daring prose with her earlier collection “The Really Funny Thing About Apathy.” Her latest, a hybrid of fiction and poetry, is sure to see a (relatively) wider audience.

THE REDISCOVERED CLASSIC

“The Stories of Frederick Busch” by Frederick Busch, edited by Elizabeth Strout (W. W. Norton, Dec. 2, $35)

Busch, who died in 2006, was admired for poetic fiction with a strong sense of history. Strout, who won the Pulitzer Prize for her story collection, “Olive Kitteridge,” hopes to introduce him to new readers.

THE UK IMPORT

“The Hired Man” by Aminatta Forna (Atlantic Monthly, Oct. 1, $24)

Steve Yarbrough tips us off to this Glasgow-born, London-dwelling writer, who’ll spend the year as a visiting professor at Williams College. Her latest book — the fourth to be published stateside — is set in a Croatian village in the aftermath of war.

THE ADVENTUROUS ANTHOLOGY

“The Best of McSweeney’s,” edited by Dave Eggers (McSweeney’s, Nov. 12, $28)

A now-august journal commemorates its 15th year of championing bold writers and illustrators.

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