You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

The Boston Globe

Movies

DVD reviews: ‘Diana Vreeland’

DIANA VREELAND: THE EYE HAS TO TRAVEL

James Karales/Samuel Goldwyn Films

DIANA VREELAND: THE EYE HAS TO TRAVEL

DIANA VREELAND: THE EYE HAS TO TRAVEL

In less than 90 minutes, this documentary walks us through sketches of the legendary fashion magazine editor’s private life and the formulation and decades-long execution of her philosophy in the pages of Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue. The energy here is a selling point. So is the reminder that clothes weren’t fashion to her. People were.

Extras: additional interviews. (Entertainment One, $24.98, already available)

Continue reading below

BULLY Lee Hirsch’s documentary applies a gloss of lyricism to the ugliness of adolescent torment. It has three or four moments of real alarm and, on a school bus, one nightmarish motif. But Hirsch struggles to shape it (three editors are credited). The movie doesn’t need research or great filmmaking or narrative focus, per se. It needs only the shaming power of its relentlessness and a young audience open to feeling that shame.

Extras: Q&A with Hirsch, featurettes, deleted scenes. (Starz/Anchor Bay, $24.98; Blu-Ray, $29.98)

THE KID ON A BIKE A young boy (Thomas Doret) is abandoned by his father. It sounds tragic in outline, and Belgium’s Dardenne brothers film it in their usual minimalist style, but this Cannes prizewinner is, remarkably, about hope — about the connections people forge when the ones they’ve been given desert them. With Cécile de France. In French, with English subtitles.

Extras: interviews with director and actors, featurette on locations in the film, new subtitles translation, new digital transfer. (Criterion Collection, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.95)

A LIAR’S AUTOBIOGRAPHY: THE UNTRUE
STORY OF MONTY
PYTHON’S GRAHAM CHAPMAN
And now for something completely different: an animated multi-chapter documentary life story that’s narrated by its own subject, Monty Python’s Graham Chapman, who has been inconveniently dead for 23 years, and who’s probably making it all up anyway. (Virgil Films, $24.99; Arts Alliance, Blu-ray, $34.99)

Continue reading below

THE MAN WITH THE IRON FISTS Wu-Tang Clan major-domo RZA has gathered his friends — co-writer Eli Roth, presenter Quentin Tarantino, costars Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu — and directed a martial arts movie. A pretty terrible martial arts movie. Still, it’s more goofily entertaining than it has a right to be. With Rick Yune and Jamie Chung. (Universal, $29.98; Blu-ray, $34.98)

PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORY The one-of-a-kind documentarian Ross McElwee (“Sherman’s March”) continues the ongoing filmic investigation of his life. The point of departure this time is the dichotomy — or is it continuity? — between older generation-younger and analog-digital, as McElwee examines his relationship with his son, Adrian, and Adrian’s fascination with the Internet.

Extras: archival photo gallery. (First Run Features, $25.99)

GLOBE STAFF

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week