You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

The Boston Globe

Movies

Movie Stars

Movie capsules: Short reviews of what’s in theaters

New releases

La Sirga A young woman (Joghis Seudyn Arias) escapes the violence that kills her family and shows up at her estranged uncle’s inn at a remote village in the high Andes. The film’s slow pace might only appeal to the most fervent fans of art house or Latin American Cinema. But Sofia Oggioni’s naturalistic photography establishes an atmosphere of isolation and William Vega’s sparse direction casts a hypnotic, ominous spell. (89 min., unrated) (Loren King)

Thursday Till Sunday Chilean filmmaker Dominga Sotomayor’s assured feature debut takes place almost entirely within the confines of a car. It’s a road trip film from the back-seat point of view of 10-year-old Lucia (Santi Ahumada), who observes her parents as they drive north from Santiago on vacation. The dialogue is spare and the pace slow, but the film is beautifully photographed by Bárbara Álvarez and beautifully acted by Ahumada. In Spanish, with subtitles. (94 min., unrated) (Loren King)

Previously released

Continue reading below

Dead Man Down Colin Farrell and Noomi Rapace are urban loners whose parallel revenge plots intertwine. A loopy, violent crime thriller that has its melodramatic charms before the story gets stupid, it’s the first Hollywood film by Niels Arden Oplev. Costarring Terrence Howard and, surreally, Isabelle Huppert. (118 min., R) (Ty Burr)

Emperor Japan has surrendered. General Douglas MacArthur (Tommy Lee Jones) tasks a deputy, General Bonner Fellers (Matthew Fox), to investigate whether Emperor Hirohito should be charged with war crimes. Doesn’t sound very promising, does it? Watching Jones be Jones is, as always, a kick. But, boy, even seen in flashbacks, courting a Japanese woman (Eriko Hatsune), what a hopeless stick Fox is. (104 min., PG-13) (Mark Feeney)

½ Lore In May of 1945, a 14-year-old girl (Saskia Rosendahl) leads her younger siblings across a conquered Germany toward a tortured acceptance of her country’s and family’s guilt. The second film by the gifted Australian director Cate Shortland occupies a stark dramatic minefield between historical reality and psychosexual myth. In German, with subtitles. (109 min., unrated) (Ty Burr)

Oz the Great and Powerful This unofficial prequel has 3-D, the latest computer effects, and Sam Raimi behind the camera. But a lightweight James Franco is in front of the camera as a feckless magician whisked to Oz. There are glorious moments, but the film never finds its groove. With Rachel Weisz, Michelle Williams, and Mila Kunis. (130 min., PG) (Ty Burr)

Find an archive of reviews at www.boston.com/movies.
Loading comments...

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week