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The Call Halle Berry stars as a 911 operator trying to save kidnapped teen Abigail Breslin (“Little Miss Sunshine”), who’s stuck in a psycho’s trunk with a dying cellphone. Grueling, effective suspense, and the scenes in the call center are novel, but the movie gets increasingly stupid as it caves into thriller clichés. (90 min., R) (Ty Burr)

½ A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III The actor/walking disaster known as Charlie Sheen gives a perfectly credible performance as a graphic design rock star coming undone in LA. It’s the rest of Roman Coppola’s film that tries your patience. Sun-drenched, Art Deco, unambitious, it’s what you’d imagine a Hollywood scion would make. With Bill Murray. (86 min., R) (Ty Burr)

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The Incredible Burt Wonderstone Steve Carell plays a fatuous Las Vegas magician. It’s a lazy “Anchorman” rip that you watch in a happy state of expectation anyway, because the concept’s rich and just enough of it gets onto the screen, along with fine comic actors like Steve Buscemi, Alan Arkin, and James Gandolfini. Less so Jim Carrey, who’s over-indulged. (101 min., PG-13) (Ty Burr)

La Sirga A young woman (Joghis Seudyn Arias) escapes the violence that kills her family and shows up at her estranged uncle’s inn at a remote lakeside village in the High Andes. The film’s slow pace might only appeal to the most fervent fans of art house or Latin American Cinema. But Sofia Oggioni’s naturalistic photography establishes an atmosphere of isolation and William Vega’s sparse direction casts a hypnotic, ominous spell. (89 min., unrated) (Loren King)

½ Like Someone in Love The latest small, perplexing masterpiece from the Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami (“Certified Copy”). Set in Tokyo, it follows a college student call girl (Rin Takanashi), her possessive fiance (Ryo Kase), and a retired professor (Tadashi Okuno), all chasing illusions of love. It’s a quiet, contemplative film that darkens in the memory. In Japanese, with subtitles. (109 min., unrated) (Ty Burr)

Thursday Till Sunday Chilean filmmaker Dominga Sotomayor’s assured feature debut takes place almost entirely within the confines of a car. It’s a road trip film from the back seat point of view of 10-year-old Lucia (Santi Ahumada), who observes her parents as they drive north from Santiago on vacation. The dialogue is spare and the pace slow, but the film is beautifully photographed by Bárbara Álvarez and beautifully acted by Ahumada. In Spanish, with subtitles. (94 min., unrated) (Loren King)

Upside Down Jim Sturgess and Kirsten Dunst play young lovers who live in adjoining worlds. Both lovers and worlds are kept apart by politics and physics. Writer-director Juan Solanas’s film combines elements of sci-fi, dystopian fantasy, love story, and political allegory. There’s even some tango and a sublimely funny urine joke (you read that right). The movie doesn’t quite mesh, but it’s often excitingly imaginative and visionary. (108 min., PG-13) (Mark Feeney)

½ West of Memphis A clear-eyed and convincing overview of the “West Memphis Three” case that provides a larger picture that the “Paradise Lost” trilogy of documentaries sometimes missed. Director Amy Berg takes us from the 1993 murders of three young boys to the gradual but total dismantling of the case against three men who are widely believed to have been wrongly convicted of the crimes. (147 min., R) (Ty Burr)

Find an archive of reviews at www.boston.com/movies.

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