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The Boston Globe

Music

Pink shows tough, tender sides in high-flying show

If you had to guess, Pink was ­probably airborne for a fourth of her show at TD Garden Thursday night, springing up and down on bungee cords, twirling midair on fabric ropes, suspended by cables and soaring over the sold-out audience as if she were Tinker Bell in a Broadway sendup of “Peter Pan.”

Motion suits Pink, and it is the foundation of her latest road spectacle, a hulking production billed “The Truth About Love Tour,” named after her most recent album.

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In front of 13,000-plus fans, Pink put both her body and her voice through the paces in an expertly choreo­graphed, two-hour show backed by a full band and a cast of dancers. She is the rare performer who handles party anthems (“Raise Your Glass”) and heartbreaking ballads (“Just Give Me a Reason”) with equal élan.

In a prerecorded video played before she took the stage, she acted as if she had no use for love. “You want to know the truth about love?” she asked before answering her own ­question by flipping the bird to the the camera.

That was part and parcel of her punk sensibility, but in reality, Pink is a big believer in matters of the heart. An acoustic set, with just the singer and her guitarist seated in the middle of heart-shaped extension of the stage, showed her softer side with a pair of tearjerkers: “Who Knew” and “Perfect” (which she rechristened without the expletive that’s usually in the title).

Before that, she simply smoldered on an ethereal rendering of Chris Isaak’s “Wicked Game” (though she couldn’t quite hit Isaak’s high notes, but then, who can?).

She has come a long way from her debut released in 2000, but she revisited those years with a lean medley that mashed up “Can’t Take Me Home,” “There You Go,” and “You Make Me Sick.”

The Hives, the Swedish band whose outsize frontman, Howlin’ Pelle Almqvist, was hellbent on winning over the crowd (and mostly did), opened with a taut blast of guitar- ­driven rock.

James Reed can be reached at jreed@globe.com.

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