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Bernanke warns of new financial risks

Notes increased supervision of financial system

JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images/file 2012

Ben Bernanke said that the Fed has been actively monitoring US banks’ exposures to the European debt crisis.

WASHINGTON - Chairman Ben Bernanke said Monday that the Federal Reserve is working to address the regulatory failures that were exposed by the 2008 financial crisis. But he cautioned that as the financial system evolves, new risks will emerge.

The Fed has overhauled its regulatory efforts to focus much more on the stability of the entire financial system, Bernanke said. It seeks to avoid mistakes of the past crisis, such as big nonbank institutions escaping the supervision.

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But the Fed chief said it was not enough for regulators to just address problems exposed by the crisis. The financial system is constantly evolving and unanticipated future risks to stability will develop, he said.

Bernanke’s comments came in a speech Monday night to a conference sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

The financial crisis, which hit with force in the fall of 2008 after the collapse of Lehman Brothers, underscored the need for regulators to do a better job in policing the financial system, he said.

“About three and a half years have passed since the darkest days of the financial crisis, but our economy is still far from having fully recovered from its effects,’’ Bernanke said in his remarks.

In terms of closer supervision, Bernanke noted that the central bank last month released the results of stringent stress tests in which all but four of 19 major US financial institutions received passing grades. The Fed declared the institutions strong enough to survive an economic downturn worse than the Great Recession.

In another example of stepped up supervision, Bernanke said that the Fed has been actively monitoring US banks’ direct and indirect exposures to the European debt crisis. It is also tracking the way US banks are managing their exposure to the risks posed by the European crisis.

Bernanke said that the Fed and other banking regulators are moving to impose tougher standards, not just on big banks but on big nonfinancial institutions such as insurance companies. The aim is to better regulate all financial institutions that could pose a risk to the stability of the financial system.

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