You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Airline chiefs say security must change

Volume and inconsistency are among concerns

A screening area at San Francisco International Airport. “We simply can’t cope with the expected volume of passengers with the way things are today,’’ said Tony Tyler, director general of the International Air Transport Association.

Noah Berger/Associated Press

A screening area at San Francisco International Airport. “We simply can’t cope with the expected volume of passengers with the way things are today,’’ said Tony Tyler, director general of the International Air Transport Association.

ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Airport security needs to undergo a radical overhaul or else passengers will become further disgruntled, lines will grow, and terminals will be overwhelmed, airline executives said Tuesday at a global aviation conference.

‘‘We simply can’t cope with the expected volume of passengers with the way things are today,’’ said Tony Tyler, director general and chief executive of the International Air Transport Association, the airlines’ trade group.

Continue reading below

Tyler spoke at an airlines conference in Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates.

He predicted that by 2020, governments will be using a checkpoint of the future where passengers can race though without stopping, removing clothing, or taking liquids and laptops out of bags.

While a lot of work has to be done to get numerous countries and regulators on board, Tyler is optimistic that today’s ‘‘one-size-fits all approach to screening’’ can be replaced with a system based on individual passenger risk. The industry hopes to test the concept at a handful of airports starting late 2014.

The example cited by Tyler of what is working: the US Transportation and Security Administration’s relatively new PreCheck program.

Frequent fliers who voluntarily share more information with the government get to keep their shoes, belts, and light jackets on at security. The program will be expanded to 35 airports by the end of the year.

‘‘If you’re willing to share a little more information, then you can have a much better experience,’’ John S. Pistole, head of the TSA, said. ‘‘We can then spend more time on those we know the least about.’’

The added personal information would probably be handed over voluntarily to the government by passengers who see the time savings benefit.

Pistole said the TSA would ideally like to analyze passengers’ travel history and patterns but currently lacks authority to do so. Any such changes would occur after the election, at the earliest, he said.

‘‘I applaud the TSA,’’ said Montie Brewer, former chief executive of Air Canada. “I never thought I would say it because they are the worst part of travel.’’

James E. Bennett, ex-head the Washington Airport Authority and now chief executive of the Abu Dhabi Airports Co., said that if the current immigration and security procedures remain in place as more and more passengers take to the skies, airports will run out of terminal space to hold all the lines. Many airports have already undergone multimillion dollar retrofits to house additional security and there isn’t additional room left.

The ultimate challenge may not be developing the technology but having multiple nations agree on uniform procedures.

‘‘We cannot continue to build and build and build to provide space for the existing systems and queues.’’ Tyler said. ‘‘The whole inconsistency destroys the credibility.’’

Loading comments...

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week