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Mathworks software is used to develop on-board training system for Royal Navy destroyer

Mathworks Inc., a Natick-based company that makes mathematical computing software for engineers and scientists, said Wednesday that its Model-Based Design product has been used by global defense contractor BAE Systems to develop a new on-board trainer for the Royal Navy’s Type 45 destroyer.

The on-board training system allows crew to control, reconfigure, and recover the ship’s propulsion, generation, and auxiliary systems across various scenarios in real-time, MathWorks said in a press release.

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The release included a statement from Peter Worthington, principal engineer at BAE Systems Maritime – Naval Ships’ division.

“Using conventional techniques, the OBT (on-board training) project would require two to four times more development effort for successful completion,” Worthington said. “However, with Model-Based Design, we were able to simplify our design process and ultimately needed only three engineers to model and simulate the ship’s physical systems.”

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MathWorks has been in the news of late. The company is buying the Natick office complex of Boston Scientific Corp., a medical device company that is planning to move 800 employees to Marlborough.

Last week, MathWorks said that it will buy Boston Scientific’s 500,000-square-foot complex on Lake Cochituate in Natick, near its own growing headquarters campus on Apple Hill. MathWorks added that it expects to add 400 employees next year, bringing its workforce in Massachusetts to 2,200, the Globe noted in a story about Boston Scientific’s planned move.

BAE Systems, the global defense and security company, has operations in Lexington and Nashau, N.H.

Chris Reidy can be reached at reidy@globe.com.
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