Business

MASS. MOVERS

Amid gun debate, Smith & Wesson falls

Gun control advocates marched to the National Rifle Association’s headquarters in Washington Monday.

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Gun control advocates marched to the National Rifle Association’s headquarters in Washington Monday.

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Most firearms makers are privately held, but traders turned their backs on Springfield-based Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. and Sturm, Ruger & Co., of Southport, Conn., amid speculation there will be a new a ban on assault weapons following Friday’s slaughter at a Newtown, Conn., school. Smith & Wesson has slid 9.3 percent since the massacre; Sturm Ruger, 7.8 percent. Still, Smith & Wesson’s stock has nearly doubled this year, while Sturm Ruger’s has gained 31.5 percent.

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