You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

The Boston Globe

Business

Retail sales fell 0.4 percent in March

Higher taxes have made consumers more spending-cautious, a Commerce report says.

Toby Talbot/Associated Press

Higher taxes have made consumers more spending-cautious, a Commerce report says.

WASHINGTON — Sales at US retailers fell in March from February, indicating that higher taxes and weak hiring likely made some consumers more cautious about spending.

Retail sales declined a seasonally adjusted 0.4 percent last month, the Commerce Department said Friday. That followed a 1 percent gain in February and a 0.1 percent decline in January. Both February and January figures were revised lower.

Continue reading below

Consumers cut back across a wide range of categories last month. Sales at auto dealers dropped 0.6 percent. Gas station sales dropped 2.2 percent, partly reflecting lower prices. The retail figures aren’t adjusted for price changes.

Excluding the volatile categories of autos, gas, and building materials, core sales dropped 0.2 percent in March. That followed a gain of 0.3 percent in February. Department stores, electronics retailers, and sporting goods outlets all reported lower sales.

The retail sales report is the government’s first look at consumer spending, which drives about 70 percent of economic activity.

The decline in March shows higher Social Security taxes are starting to affect consumers and could dampen growth in the spring.

Many economists still predict economic growth accelerated to an annual rate of roughly 3 percent in the January-March quarter. That would be a significant increase from the anemic growth rate of 0.4 percent reported for the October-December quarter.

Still, economists say the improvement is probably temporary. Many now expect weaker spending will be among factors that slow growth again in the April-June quarter, to an annual rate of around 1.5 percent.

‘‘The US consumer looks a little less resilient,’’ said Michael Feroli, an economist at JPMorgan Chase. ‘‘It now appears that close to $200 billion in higher taxes may have actually had some impact on consumer spending.’’

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week