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No idea how to start retirement planning? Author shares lessons he has learned the hard way

You know the saying, “It’s not rocket science.”

Well, today’s retirement planning is rocket science. It’s often confusing and overly complex. There’s so much you need to know.

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Let me put you to the test. How much do you know about the following?

  When to take your Social Security. Securian Financial Group surveyed baby boomers 50 to 65 about their plans for claiming Social Security retirement benefits. Only 18 percent knew how or when to go onto Social Security.

  The cost to have Medicare. Nearly three-fourths of boomers surveyed by Bankers Life and Casualty Co. Center for a Secure Retirement didn’t know that most Americans on Medicare pay premiums, copays, and deductibles.

 Long-term care insurance. Only 14 percent of participants in the Bankers Life survey knew that Medicare generally does not cover long-term care. Long-term care insurance can help cover the cost of nursing homes, assisted-living facilities, and in-home care. The insurance pays expenses for those who need assistance with daily activities such as eating, dressing, and bathing, or who have a severe cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  Your company pension. Have you considered whether to take a lump-sum distribution instead of monthly payments? Could you manage the money if you take a lump sum?

Even some people with strong financial backgrounds aren’t prepared enough for their own retirement.

If anyone should have mastered the science of retirement, it would have been Stan Hinden, who spent the last 12 years of his 45-year journalism career as a financial columnist for the Washington Post. Yet Hinden, now 86, admits that he was not prepared with the breadth of knowledge he needed to handle his affairs in retirement.

But, oh, what experience can teach you.

After 17 years in retirement, Hinden is well versed in many issues and shares his wisdom in the Color of Money Book Club selection for April — “How to Retire Happy: The 12 Most Important Decisions You Must Make Before You Retire” (McGraw Hill, $20).

Be sure to get the updated fourth edition, which contains the most recent information about Medicare. The chapter on health insurance covers new deductibles for Medicare Part A (pays for hospital stays) and the new deductible and new premiums for Medicare Part B (pays for medical tests, doctor and preventive services). It also gives details on the new premiums for Part D (prescriptions).

Also new to the book are the health issues affecting his wife, Sara. She suffers from Alzheimer’s and lives in a small group home for dementia patients.

“Signs of Sara’s illness first appeared in 2007, when she was 78,” he writes. “Needless to say, Sara’s condition dramatically changed both her retirement and mine. . . . My experience with Alzheimer’s disease has given me a new perspective on how one prepares for serious illness during retirement.”

One way to prepare is consider getting long-term care insurance. Sara’s policy, which she took out at age 62, is helping defray the cost of her care, which runs about $4,000 a month. The insurance pays $130 a day, or $3,900 a month. But her maximum total benefit is $260,000, which equates to 5.5 years. The chapter on long-term care is scary and depressing. Yet it is a must read.

Hinden invites you into the retirement life he and his wife have experienced. Their journey is what makes this book so readable and relatable. He nicely weaves their financial decisions and dilemmas around the most important information you’ll need.

I asked Hinden what advice he would give someone within five years of retiring.

Start working on your retirement budget now, he said.

“Pay close attention to your likely health expenses,” he added. “Prepare to go on Medicare at 65, if you are not already there. See if you can upgrade your secondary health insurance, or arrange to buy it. Study your prescription drug expenses and see if you can minimize those expenses.”

Hinden has become smarter and wants to help show you how to retire happier and better informed.

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