You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Etiquette at work

The best stationery for saying thank you

Numerous times I have extolled the virtues of the thank-you note. It sets you apart from the competition. It brings you to the front of the mind of the recipients. And it does so repeatedly, as they are reminded of you each time they see that note.

What, you may wonder, is an appropriate piece of paper on which to write a thank-you note, and, for that matter, what constitutes the kind of stationery a business person should have on hand. In other words, what should be in your stationery drawer?

Continue reading below

Corporate letterhead. That’s the formal, 8½-by-11-inch paper with a corporate logo and the company name and address on it. Typically, business letterhead is a high quality sheet of paper, often 24-pound weight to make it feel more substantial in the recipient’s hands. You should also have second sheets, which have nothing printed on them, for letters of more than one page.

Executive sheets. These are smaller — 7¼ inches by 10½ inches. Sometimes referred to as monarch sheets, they are used for more personal business correspondence. Typically, they will be printed with an individual’s name and the business address but not the company name or logo . If used as formal letterhead, remember to order second sheets as well.

Envelopes. Envelopes that match corporate or executive letterhead have the logo or name and address of the company printed on the face side.

Correspondence cards. These are small, single piece note cards 4½ inches by 6½ inches in size. Your name is the only item printed on these cards. Alternatively, correspondence stationery can be a 9-by-6½-inch sheet folded in half. Your name and address should be printed on matching envelopes.

Business cards. The typical business card is 3½ inches by 2 inches, although you will see people offer nontraditional size cards in the hopes that the card will be more memorable. Often, these cards do not fit in standard size cardholders or wallet slots. The card should contain contact information including name, position, company name, address, and phone number. You can also include cell and fax numbers, e-mail address, website URL, and social networking addresses.

If your name is nongender specific (for instance Adrian or Kelly or Sandy) use a courtesy title (Mr. Adrian Jones or Ms. Kelly Smith) to remove any confusion.

E-mail questions about business etiquette to etiquetteatwork@emilypost.com.
Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.