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Black media seek share of ordered tobacco ads

RICHMOND — Black media outlets want the nation’s tobacco companies to run court-ordered advertisements in their publications and news sites as part of a lawsuit charging that the industry lied about the dangers of smoking.

In a brief in the US District Court in Washington, D.C., ahead of a Wednesday hearing in the case, the National Newspaper Publishers Association and National Association of Black Owned Broadcasters argued that the ads should be disseminated through their outlets because the black community has been disproportionally targeted by tobacco companies and harmed by smoking. The groups are asking the court to consider adding its outlets to the list of newspapers, TV stations, and websites where the so-called corrective statements are to be published. The statements also are to accompany cigarette packages.

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Also on Tuesday, Fox Broadcasting Corp. filed a brief with the court asking that the corrective statements also be aired on its network.

The statements are part of a case the government brought in 1999 under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act. US District Judge Gladys Kessler ruled in that case in 2006 that the nation’s largest cigarette makers concealed the dangers of smoking for decades and ordered them to pay for corrective statements. The companies involved in the case include the top three tobacco companies: Richmond-based Altria Group, owner of the biggest US tobacco company, Philip Morris USA; cigarette maker, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., owned by Winston-Salem, N.C.-based Reynolds American Inc.; and cigarette maker Lorillard Inc., based in Greensboro, N.C.

The tobacco companies and the federal government reached an agreement last week on the details of publishing those statements. The court must still approve the agreement.

The media groups that represent more than 120 publications and more than 200 radio stations and TV stations said the list included in the judge’s order doesn’t have publications in areas with very large black populations and will not effectively reach the black community, who are ‘‘not only more susceptible to harm from tobacco usage, but were also intentionally and systematically targeted by [the tobacco companies] to be recipients of their illegal marketing campaigns.’’

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