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    Spreading food truck access far and wide

    Anne-Marie Aigner says that food truck festivals help bring mobile cuisine, from mac and cheese to cannoli, to areas without many trucks.
    Jonathan Wiggs/Globe Staff
    Anne-Marie Aigner says that food truck festivals help bring mobile cuisine, from mac and cheese to cannoli, to areas without many trucks.

    What’s the appeal of a food truck rodeo or rally? When food trucks gather en masse, it’s a street festival with artisanal foods ranging from noodle bowls to mac and cheese to cannoli, says Anne-Marie Aigner, executive producer of Food Truck Festivals of America, a Boston company that organizes food truck extravaganzas. Aigner spoke with Globe correspondent Cindy Atoji Keene about the logistics of putting on a dozen festivals a year from the Arnold Arboretum to Albuquerque.

    “After three years of creating food truck festivals throughout New England, my marketing partner, Janet Prensky, and I think we know the formula. Typically, we try to bring food truck festivals to locations like Worcester, where people don’t have a density of food trucks. We work with the vendors to keep prices low and keep lines moving.

    “Guests want to have a drink while grazing, although this does complicate our venue requirements because it requires a liquor license. I started this venture three years ago as an experiment. Today, we have a database of over 450 trucks in New England and also act as a clearinghouse to match food trucks with private events like weddings, block parties, and office luncheons.

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    “What’s my favorite food truck? I do love the Whoopie Pie Wagon — it has red velvet, chocolate chip, and even gluten-free whoopies. Unfortunately, you can’t make a meal out of a whoopie pie.”

    Cindy Atoji Keene can be reached at cindy@cindyatoji.com.