Business

On the Job

Freedom of Internet choice motivates ‘broadband hero’

Max Ariza, field operations manager for netBlazr, installed equipment on a South End roof. The service provides high speed Internet access using unlicensed radio frequencies.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Max Ariza, field operations manager for netBlazr, installed equipment on a South End roof. The service provides high speed Internet access using unlicensed radio frequencies.

Max Ariza spends his days on rooftops, installing powerful radio antennas that can provide high speed Internet access using unlicensed radio frequencies — the same sort of wave spectrum used for walkie-talkies or garage door openers — as a cheaper alternative to cable and phone company providers.

Ariza, a field operations manager at netBlazr of Allston, spoke about what it’s like to be part of a Boston startup that is aiming to bring a broadband network to the city.

“Our network is optimized for ultra-high speed Internet. We connect hundreds of buildings throughout Boston. We use this “air fiber” wireless technology to bring service to a building, instead of pulling cables through the streets. Once we are on a building, we use the existing wiring in that building to bring service to residents or businesses there. Our customers receive an ethernet cable from netBlazr which they then plug into their network or wireless router.

“As a startup, our awareness comes from word-of-mouth and from the sheer frustration that people have over the lack of choice between Internet providers. The technology that netBlazr uses is continually improving its performance, much like computers get faster and more powerful with each generation. Our customers are big fans of what netBlazr is doing. That really makes my job a lot of fun. Sure, call me a broadband hero.”

Cindy Atoji Keene can be reached at cindy@cindyatoji.com.
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