Lifestyle

Home Design

Open concept rooms

Peter Urbanski

While the house was good-size, the rooms of this Canton home had little connection to one another, says interior designer Tracy Parkinson. “Rooms were small and closed off and the house was dark because it was broken up into so many disjointed spaces.” When the
homeowners decided to renovate, the objective was to make the main living spaces feel brighter and more open and they asked Parkinson to bring their ideas to fruition.

Parkinson collaborated with contractor Robert Way, who removed the walls separating the kitchen, living, and dining rooms. “Where before those had all been separate spaces, they were now joined to create one big open room,” says Parkinson. Windows were added and the ceilings, which are low, were painted high-gloss white, which helps bounce light around the space. Several new sources of light were added: In the kitchen, recessed lighting and oil-rubbed bronze fixtures by the sink that can be positioned to illuminate different spots now offer a brighter outlook.

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To promote an airy feel and flow, walls are painted Benjamin Moore Revere Pewter and trim and cabinetry are white. The absence of upper cabinets in the kitchen adds to the airy appeal and helps the distinct areas feel connected to one another.

“Since the cabinets were custom made we could be very specific about the size of each cabinet, each one was designed exactly for what was being stored in it,” says Parkinson.

Peter Urbanski

Kitchen

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Parkinson had the white subway backsplash tile installed all the way up to the ceiling. “Since the ceilings are low there wouldn’t have been a lot of wall space between the ceiling and the backsplash if we’d done it the usual way,” she says. “Doing it like this gives the illusion of a higher ceiling.” Counters are granite; the three metal stools, painted chartreuse, at the peninsula add a little pop.

Peter Urbanski

Dining area

An alcove was specifically designed to suit three tall shelf and drawer units from Ballard Designs, which store glassware and serving pieces. The farmhouse-style table and chairs from Restoration Hardware have a rustic appeal. In contrast, Parkinson selected a chandelier of glass globes with stainless steel arms. “To balance the rusticity of the farm table, I want the light to feel very modern,” she says.

Peter Urbanski

Living Area

New Mission-style windows throughout add an appealing architectural detail. “The house doesn’t have crown molding or other striking details so the interesting window style was a really nice element to add,” says Parkinson. The pinstripe sofa is from Pottery Barn; the wool and jute boucle rug is from West Elm.

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