Lifestyle

Top 5 lifestyle stories of the year

One of the many Canadian road signs that Ty Burr doesn’t understand.
One of the many Canadian road signs that Ty Burr doesn’t understand.

Stories about Canadian road signs, pirates at MIT, and slow parenting are the most-viewed stories about life from 2015, starting with the most popular:

1. Do you speak Canadian road sign?

Ty Burr returned with something to say after a week of camping in Canada and pondering “What in the name of Rob Ford were the road signs trying to tell us?”

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2. On Nantucket, a gym with a $120,000 initiation fee

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Nantucket’s Planning Board approved construction of a private health and fitness club with a $120,000 initiation fee and a $5,000 annual fee, but if you have to even think about that, the Ezia Athletic Club might not be for you.

In order to get your pirate certificate at MIT, you must complete courses in archery, pistol shooting, sailing, and fencing. So far, six students have been granted pirate status.
david l. ryan/globe staff
In order to get your pirate certificate at MIT, you must complete courses in archery, pistol shooting, sailing, and fencing.

3. MIT awards pirate certificates to undergraduates

It’s been an unofficial, underground practice among students at MIT for at least 20 years: Any student who completes courses in pistol, archery, sailing, and fencing is considered a pirate.

Charles Gullung/Getty Images

4. The benefits of slow parenting

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Loosely, slow parenting means no more rushing around physically and metaphorically, no more racing kids from soccer to violin to art class. Slow parenting cherishes quality over quantity, being in the moment, and making meaningful connections with your family.

Joey Kim (center) graduated from Harvard in 2015.
Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff
Joey Kim (center) graduated from Harvard in 2015.

5. To get into elite colleges, some advised to ‘appear less Asian’

As lawsuits allege racial quotas at elite colleges, high-achieving applicants call on consultants to help win admission — and receive guidance on minimizing their ethnicity.