You can now read 10 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

The Boston Globe

Food & dining

This day in history

Wednesday, Jan. 2, is the second day of 2013. There are 363 days left in the year.

Today’s birthdays: Country musician Harold Bradley is 87. Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert is 71. TV host Jack Hanna is 66. Actress Wendy Phillips is 61. Actress Gabrielle Carteris is 52. Movie director Todd Haynes is 52. Retired MLB All-Star pitcher David Cone is 50. Actress Tia Carrere is 46. Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. is 45. Model Christy Turlington is 44. Actor Taye Diggs is 42. Rock musician Scott Underwood (Train) is 42. Rock singer Doug Robb (Hoobastank) is 38. Actor Dax Shepard is 38. Actress Paz Vega is 37. Country musician Chris Hartman is 35. Rock musician Jerry DePizzo Jr. (O.A.R.) is 34. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kelton Kessee (IMX) is 32. Actress Kate Bosworth is 30. Jazz singer-musician Trombone Shorty is 27.

Continue reading below

In 1788, Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the US Constitution.

In 1893, the US Postal Service issued its first commemorative stamp to honor the World’s Columbian Expedition and the quadricentennial of Christopher Columbus’s voyage.

In 1900, Secretary of State John Hay announced the ‘‘Open Door Policy’’ to facilitate trade with China.

In 1921, the play that coined the term ‘‘robot,’’ ‘’R.U.R.’’ (Rossum’s Universal Robots) by Karel Capek, was first performed in Czechoslovakia.

In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in Flemington, N.J., on charges of kidnapping and murdering the 20-month-old son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was found guilty, and executed.)

Continue reading below

In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by the Japanese during World War II.

In 1959, the Soviet Union launched its space probe Luna 1, the first manmade object to fly past the moon, its apparent intended target.

In 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his bid for the presidency.

In 1971, 66 people were killed in a pileup of spectators leaving a soccer match in Glasgow.

In 1974, President Richard M. Nixon signed legislation requiring states to limit highway speeds to 55 miles per hour. (Federal speed limits were abolished in 1995).

In 1981, police in Sheffield, England, arrested Peter Sutcliffe, who confessed to being the ‘‘Yorkshire Ripper,’’ the serial killer of 13 women.

In 1983, the musical play ‘‘Annie’’ closed on Broadway after a run of 2,377 performances.

In 2006, 12 miners died in a methane gas explosion at the Sago Mine in West Virginia. One miner was eventually rescued.

In 2008, the Justice Department opened a full criminal investigation into the destruction of CIA interrogation videotapes. (A special prosecutor later cleared the CIA’s former top clandestine officer and others.) Pakistan pushed back parliamentary elections until Feb. 18, a six-week delay prompted by rioting that followed the assassination of opposition leader Benazir Bhutto. Oil prices soared to $100 a barrel for the first time. Late-night talk shows returned to the air two months into a writers strike. (David Letterman and Craig Ferguson had reached agreements to allow writers to work on their shows; Jay Leno, Conan O’Brien, and ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel returned without theirs.)

You have reached the limit of 10 free articles in a month

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week