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The Boston Globe

Food & dining

  

Recipe for sausage, apple, and white bean pies

Makes 8 individual pies

Look for 4½-inch foil pie tins, such as Hefty EZ Foil brand, available at most supermarkets.

FILLING

pounds (about 6 links) fresh or fully cooked pork sausage
2tablespoons olive oil
1large onion, chopped
1red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped
2carrots, chopped
2ribs celery, chopped
2firm apples, such as Fuji or Gala, peeled, cored, and cut into ¾-inch pieces
2tablespoons flour
cups apple cider
¾cup chicken stock
1can (15 ounces) white beans, rinsed and drained
Salt and black pepper, to taste

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1. Cut the sausage into bite-size pieces. (If using fresh, uncooked sausage, you can remove the casing, if you like.)

2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, heat the olive oil. Add half the sausage and cook, stirring often, for 5 to 7 minutes or until browned. Transfer to a plate. (If using fresh sausage, it might not be fully cooked at this point.) Repeat with the remaining sausage. Discard all but 1 tablespoon of fat from the pan.

3. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the bell pepper, carrots, and celery. Cook for 5 minutes or until the vegetables start to soften. Add the apples and return the sausage to the pan. Stir in the flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the cider and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, stirring occasionally, for 20 to 25 minutes or until most of the liquid evaporates.

4. Add the stock, bring to a boil, and simmer for 3 minutes. Add the beans and season with salt and black pepper. Let the stew cool, then cover, and refrigerate.

CRUST

5cups flour
3tablespoons sugar
2teaspoons kosher salt
1pound (4 sticks) unsalted butter, cut into small chunks
½cup (or more) ice water
Olive oil (for the pan)
Flour (for sprinkling)

1. In an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or the whisk), combine the flour, sugar and salt. Add the butter and turn the mixer on low. Mix for about 3 minutes, stopping once or twice to break up clumps of butter with your fingers. When the mixture is crumbly, but with small chunks of butter remaining, remove the bowl from the stand.

2. Sprinkle the water over the dough. Using your hands, turn the dough over and over until it starts to clump together. (Add a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, if needed.) Turn the clumps out onto a clean surface and knead with your hands to form a large ball. Divide the dough into two pieces, with one a little larger than the other. Press them into disks and wrap separately in foil; refrigerate for 1 hour.

3. Set the oven at 375 degrees. Oil 8 mini pie tins (4½ to 5 inches top diameter). Have on hand 2 rimmed baking sheets.

4. Working with the larger disk of dough, cut it into 8 wedges. On a lightly floured counter, roll each piece into a 6½-inch round. Place the dough in the pans and press gently into the bottom and up the sides. The dough should hang slightly over the edge of the pans; trim any excess and reroll with the remaining dough.

5. Cut the remaining (smaller) disk of dough into 8 wedges. On a lightly floured surface, roll out each piece into a 5½-inch round. Place the rounds, slightly overlapping, on a plate.

6. Fill each pie shell with about 1 cup of the sausage filling. Cover each pie with one of the 5½-inch rounds. Press the edges together to seal them and use your fingers to crimp them or a fork to press them evenly all around. Cut a few steam vents in the tops of the pies.

7. Set the pies on the baking sheets. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until the tops are browned and the filling is bubbling. Remove from the oven and let sit for 5 minutes. Run a knife around each pie and tilt it out of the tin and onto a plate. Lisa Zwirn. Adapted from Park Restaurant & Bar

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