You can now read 5 articles in a month for free on BostonGlobe.com. Read as much as you want anywhere and anytime for just 99¢.

Brandeis professor to lead health board

Stuart Altman, professor of national health policy at Brandeis University, will chair a new state board charged with setting health care spending goals and tracking providers’ progress toward reducing costs.

The 11-member Health Policy Commission board was created under the state health cost-control law that passed this summer and takes effect Monday. The measure aims to control health spending by limiting its rise to the annual growth of the state economy.

Continue reading below

The commission is responsible for setting that annual target, monitoring efforts to reach it, and publishing yearly recommendations on how to control costs. It will work with the new Center for Health Information and Analysis, an independent state agency. That group will be led by Áron Boros, who has been commissioner of the Division of Health Care Finance and Policy since 2011.

Altman, a health economist in Brandeis’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management, has been working on the issue of health care costs for four decades.

“Dr. Altman’s experience in matters of health policy in both the public and private sectors is deep and unparalleled and will be an asset to the Commonwealth in our work to drive health care costs down,” Governor Deval Patrick said in a press release.

The governor, attorney general, and state auditor are finalizing other appointments to the commission, which will hold its first meeting Nov. 16. The commission effectively replaces the Health Care Quality and Cost Council.

Altman said he accepted the role of chairman because he believes the state has an unprecedented opportunity. Time and again, state and national efforts to rein in health care costs have failed, he said.

“I’m cautiously optimistic that we can make it work here in Massachusetts and that eventually we will be the model for the rest of the country.”

Chelsea Conaboy can be reached at cconaboy@boston.com. Follow her on Twitter @cconaboy.
Loading comments...
Subscriber Log In

We hope you've enjoyed your 5 free articles'

Stay informed with unlimited access to Boston’s trusted news source.

  • High-quality journalism from the region’s largest newsroom
  • Convenient access across all of your devices
  • Today’s Headlines daily newsletter
  • Subscriber-only access to exclusive offers, events, contests, eBooks, and more
  • Less than 25¢ a week
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Marketing image of BostonGlobe.com
Already a subscriber?
Your city. Your stories. Your Globe.
Yours FREE for two weeks.
Enjoy free unlimited access to Globe.com for the next two weeks.
Limited time only - No credit card required!
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.
Thanks & Welcome to Globe.com
You now have unlimited access for the next two weeks.
BostonGlobe.com complimentary digital access has been provided to you, without a subscription, for free starting today and ending in 14 days. After the free trial period, your free BostonGlobe.com digital access will stop immediately unless you sign up for BostonGlobe.com digital subscription. Current print and digital subscribers are not eligible for the free trial.