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Daily low-dose aspirin may cut pancreatic cancer risk

Daily low-dose aspirin may cut pancreatic cancer risk

Taking a daily low-dose aspirin may cut the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, a new study found.

Researchers at Yale University School of Public Health looked at the medical history — including aspirin use — of 362 pancreatic cancer patients and 690 patients who did not have the disease from 30 hospitals in Connecticut between 2005 and 2009.

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Patients who took either low-dose aspirin or regular aspirin daily had reduced pancreatic cancer risk, the study found. The longer patients took daily low-dose aspirin — 75 to 325 milligrams — the lower was their risk for pancreatic cancer. Those who took aspirin daily for six years or less had a 39 percent reduced risk for pancreatic cancer, while those who took it for more than 10 years cut their risk by 60 percent.

Those who have risk factors for pancreatic cancer such as a strong family history may want to consider taking a daily aspirin, the authors wrote.

BOTTOM LINE: Taking a daily low-dose aspirin may cut the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by as much as a half.

CAUTIONS: The study cannot prove a causal relationship between daily aspirin use and pancreatic cancer prevention.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, June 26

Milk, egg allergies more stressful to parents than
peanut allergies

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Parents of children with milk and egg allergies have higher anxiety and stress levels than parents of children with peanut allergies, according to a new study.

Researchers at the University of Michigan surveyed 305 caregivers of children who are allergic to milk, eggs, peanuts, or tree nuts. In general, parents who knew exactly which foods triggered an allergic reaction in their child reported having lower anxiety and stress levels compared with those who did not.

However, parents of children with milk and egg allergies reported having the highest level of stress and anxiety. Although peanut and tree nut allergies are more common, milk and eggs are found in many more foods, which could explain these parents’ responses, the authors wrote.

Overall, 64 percent of caregivers said they understood how severe their child’s allergic reactions are to foods. Nineteen percent underestimated the severity of their child’s reaction, while 15 percent overestimated the severity. Those who overestimated the severity of their child’s reactions, along with those who said they wouldn’t know how exactly to respond if their child had a reaction and those who felt that others didn’t understand how severe their child’s allergies are, tended to have higher anxiety.

BOTTOM LINE: Parents of children with milk and egg allergies have higher anxiety and stress levels than parents of children with peanut allergies.

CAUTIONS: The study relied on self-reported survey results from participants so the findings may not be accurate.

WHERE TO FIND IT: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology,
June 26

LARA SALAHI

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