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Ted Williams bio headed to the small screen

Ted Williams (right) in 1976, with Don Zimmer.

Frank O'Brien/Globe Staff/File

Ted Williams (right) in 1976, with Don Zimmer.

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The life and times of one of baseball’s greatest hitters may soon be the subject of a TV miniseries. Atmosphere Entertainment and Mandalay Sports Media announced Friday they have optioned “The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams,” the voluminous bio written by longtime former Globie Ben Bradlee Jr. The book, published last year, traces the complicated life and remarkable career of Williams, whose four decades with the Red Sox were interrupted by two stints as a Marines Corps pilot in World War II and Korea. “Ben Bradlee Jr’s. biography is rich in its detail and illuminates Ted Williams as an iconic American sports figure whose life surpasses his career,” Atmosphere’s Mark Canton said in a statement. (Mandalay, whose CEO is Boston native Peter Guber, has produced such films as “The Kids Are All Right” and “Bernie,” while Atmosphere Entertainment’s credits include “The Spiderwick Chronicles.”) Bradlee, who spent the better part of a decade working on the book, said he’s delighted that Hollywood producers are interested. “They seem quite passionate about the story, they liked my book and said they want to make a movie,” Bradlee told us. “It seems like a lot of the creative energy in Hollywood is heading toward television and away from conventional theatrical releases. (The producers) see this as an epic tale, the way I do.” But don’t expect to see Williams’s frozen head on your television. Producers say they won’t dwell on the bizarre decision by members of Williams’s family to keep his remains at a cryogenic facility. Mandalay’s Mike Tollin told Deadline.com it won’t be in the miniseries, but Bradlee suspects it will be impossible to ignore. “It’s a sad and dark coda to Ted’s life,” he said. “But I don’t think it will be the focus. Why would it be?”

Names can be reached at names@globe.com. Follow Mark Shanahan on Twitter @MarkAShanahan. Follow Meredith Goldstein on Twitter @MeredithGoldste.
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