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ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

Antiques & Collectibles

Above, this special-order Winchester model 1886 made for auto magnate John F. Dodge was the top seller at James D. Julia’s Firearms Auction, bringing $333,500 against a $175,000-$275,000 estimate. Among the pistols was Frank Sinatra’s gold and silver inlaid semi-auto pistol that he gave to Henry Cattaneo, the coproducer of his last three albums, which sold for $12,650 (estimate $2,500-$4,000). The top-selling jewel at Skinner’s Fine Jewelry Auction, this necklace of 62 natural pearls, sold for $120,000 (estimate $30,000-$40,000).

Above, this special-order Winchester model 1886 made for auto magnate John F. Dodge was the top seller at James D. Julia’s Firearms Auction, bringing $333,500 against a $175,000-$275,000 estimate. Among the pistols was Frank Sinatra’s gold and silver inlaid semi-auto pistol that he gave to Henry Cattaneo, the coproducer of his last three albums, which sold for $12,650 (estimate $2,500-$4,000). The top-selling jewel at Skinner’s Fine Jewelry Auction, this necklace of 62 natural pearls, sold for $120,000 (estimate $30,000-$40,000).

A special-order rifle made for automobile magnate John F. Dodge, a small table clock, and an 18th-century American silver salver were the top sellers at New England’s March auctions.

The gold-inlaid Winchester model 1886 engraved with Dodge’s monogram “JFD” was the top seller at James D. Julia’s March 11-12 Firearms Auction, bringing $333,500 against a $175,000-
$275,000 estimate. Another Dodge special-order lever-action rifle, a Savage 1899 with a $125,000-$150,000 estimate, brought the fourth highest price of $143,750.

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The auction’s expected top seller, a Winchester 1876 “1 of 1,000” deluxe lever-action rifle, brought the second highest price of $230,000 (its estimate was $250,000-$300,000).

It was followed by the $184,000 paid for a group of items that descended in the family of Colonel George G. Briggs, the last commander of the 7th Michigan Cavalry, George Armstrong Custer’s original Civil War regiment. Included in the group, which had a $45,000-
$65,000 estimate, were a gold Custer valor medal authorized by Custer for recipients in his Michigan brigade and a piece of the Appomattox surrender flag.

A Tiffany Civil War presentation sword given to Major General Daniel E. Sickles, a Medal of Honor winner, went for $132,500 against a $125,000-
$150,000 estimate.

Historic offerings that failed to find buyers included an 18th-century German-made gun that was given to King Louis XV of France (estimate $150,000-
$250,000) and sharpshooter Annie Oakley’s Remington model 12F pump-action rifle ($150,000-$200,000).

The 1,085-lot auction grossed over $13 million.

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The top seller of the 553 lots at Skinner’s March 12 Fine Jewelry Auction was a 6½-inch-high Edwardian carved agate and enamel pendulette (small clock) engraved “Cartier, Paris 187” that brought $174,000 against a $15,000-
$20,000 estimate.

An unusual timepiece, it featured a rotating ball dial with Roman numeral indicators and a rose-cut diamond star to indicate the time. The ball sat atop the “Three Wise Monkeys” of “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil” fame.

The expected top seller was a platinum brooch designed by Cartier, Paris as flexible swags set with diamonds weighing 25 carats. Estimated to bring $50,000-$60,000, it went for $51,500, the auction’s fourth highest price.

The top-selling piece of jewelry was a necklace of 62 graduated natural pearls that brought $120,000 against a $30,000-$40,000 estimate. It was followed by the $78,000 paid for a gray natural pearl and diamond pendant with a $20,000-$30,000 estimate.

All but one of the other six top 10 sellers featured diamonds in various forms, from a diamond brooch set with an emerald intaglio depicting a family crest and two sapphires of Burma origin that sold for $50,400 (estimate $18,000-$22,000) to a 17-inch-long platinum necklace set with old European-cut diamonds weighing nearly 9 carats ($33,600 against $15,000-$20,000).

The auction grossed $2.5 million.

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A circa 1740 silver salver by the New York Huguenot silversmith George Ridout was the top seller at Northeast Auctions’ March 9-10 auction, bringing $159,300 against a $25,000-$45,000 estimate.

The 14-inch diameter salver was engraved on the reverse “The Gift of Peter & Sarah Van Brugh To Sarah Livingston.” Livingston (1725-1804) was the granddaughter of the Van Brughs, members of a Dutch family that settled in Manhattan and made its fortune in the fur trade. Their only child, Catharina, married Philip Livingston of Albany, N.Y., second lord of Livingston Manor.

Other Livingston family silver included a punch ladle that sold along with two salt spoons for $30,680 against a $3,000-$5,000 estimate.

The auction’s expected top seller was a 1918 portrait by the Boston Impressionist Edmund Tarbell of 4-year-old Wilhelmina Kirby of New York holding her doll. Estimated to bring $45,000-
$65,000, it sold for $73,750, the auction’s third highest price.

The second highest price was the $89,680 paid for a Chippendale carved mahogany serpentine chest of drawers attributed to the Salem cabinetmaker John Chipman (1748-1819). The estimate was $25,000-$45,000.

A 3-inch-long, 3-inch- high model of a horse saddled with pack tied in a diamond hitch by Charles M. Russell, the Missouri-born painter and sculptor of the Old West, soared more than 11 times over its $3,000 estimate to sell for $35,400. The horse, made of painted wax, leather, wire cloth and twisted cotton string, was a gift from Russell to his friend and collaborator Charles J. Steedman, author of “Bucking the Sagebrush, or, The Oregon Trail in the Seventies” (G.P. Putnam, 1904), which was illustrated by Russell.

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A collection of Imperial Russian items relating to Nicholas II, the last emperor of Russia, will be featured at Skinner’s European Furniture & Decorative Arts Auction Saturday at 10 a.m. at its Boston gallery.

The collection formed over 50 years by John Fletcher, a New England collector, includes photographs and prints of the Russian royal family, silver, porcelain, and brass items, icons, medals, coins, paintings, Easter eggs, and letters and bookplates dating from 1894, when Nicholas II came to the throne, to 1918 when he and his family were executed, ending the 300-year reign of the Romanovs. Czar Nicholas II was one of the richest people in history.

The eclectic 201-lot collection has estimates ranging from $6,000-$8,000 for a pair of circa 1908-17 Fabergé gilded silver and enamel napkin rings to $50-$100 for a brass umbrella stand.

Among the highlights are a white leather shoe that by tradition belonged to Czarevich Alexei Nikolaevich, Nicholas II’s son ($3,000-$5,000); a May 2, 1900, letter signed by Nicholas ($2,000-$3,000); a postcard sent as an Easter card in 1909 by the czar’s children and bearing their signatures ($4,000-$5,000); and a photogravure of Empress Alexandra Feodorovna in court attire and bearing her signature ($800-$1,200).

Other offerings are as diverse as a 1912 menu from the Imperial yacht Standart ($500-$700) and a Russian icon depicting Our Lady of Kazan ($1,000-$1,500); a handkerchief with the cipher of the Dowager Empress Maria Feodorovna ($400-$500) and an Imperial porcelain Easter egg gilt-decorated with the monogram of Tsarevich Alexei ($1,000-$1,500).

Virginia Bohlin can be reached at globe
antiques@globe.com.

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