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Recipes for cooking with Swiss chard

Serve up one of the season’s sweetest greens. Pick some in your garden or at a farmer’s market, then choose a recipe that shows off its flavor.

An omelet made with Swiss chard and Parmesan is a perfect supper on a hot night.

Photographs by Jim Scherer / Styling by Catrine Kelty

An omelet made with Swiss chard and Parmesan is a perfect supper on a hot night.

TIP Use a salad spinner to remove excess water from cooked chard.

 

PROVENCAL SWISS CHARD OMELET (TROUCHIA)

Serves 6

Continue reading below

Though this is referred to as an “omelet,” it’s thick, more like a frittata, and is finished in the oven.

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 onion, halved and sliced

Salt and pepper

2 garlic cloves, minced

2 large bunches (about 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stems removed and leaves chopped

9 large eggs

¾ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese 

With the rack in the center position, heat the oven to 400 degrees. In a 10-inch ovenproof nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat, heat 2 tablespoons oil until shimmering. Add the onion and 1 teaspoon salt, and saute for about 2 minutes. Adjust heat to medium and continue to cook, stirring frequently, until light gold, about 15 minutes. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute longer. Adjust heat to medium-high and add the chard in batches, wilting one before adding the next, about 15 minutes total. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

In a medium bowl, beat the eggs, Parmesan, and 1 teaspoon each salt and pepper, then stir in the Swiss chard. Wipe out the skillet, add remaining oil, and return to medium heat. Pour the egg mixture into the skillet and evenly distribute the chard mixture. Decrease heat to medium-low and cook, without stirring, until eggs begin to set around the edges, about 1 minute. Work a spatula between the egg and the skillet walls and, working around the skillet, gently nudge the cooked edge toward the center so that some of the uncooked egg runs underneath. When the edges have reset, repeat, shaking gingerly to loosen the frittata. Continue cooking until the surface is still moist but not liquid and cooked edges are light golden brown, about 8 minutes.

Transfer the skillet to the oven and cook until the center is set and appears dry, about 8 minutes. Loosen the edges and bottom, slide the frittata onto a serving plate, allow it to cool for about 15 minutes, and serve warm or at room temperature.

 

SWISS CHARD AND RICOTTA GNOCCHI (MALFATTI)

Serves 4 as a first course or light dinner

Malfatti are commonly served with sage-infused melted butter or simple tomato sauce, and topped with grated Parmesan.

Salt and pepper

2 large bunches (about 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stems removed and leaves chopped

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium onion, very finely chopped

3 garlic cloves, minced

1 cup ricotta

1 large egg plus 1 egg white, beaten

½ cup freshly grated Parmesan

2 tablespoons minced fresh basil

¾ cup flour

Fill a large bowl with ice water and set aside. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat. Add 1 tablespoon salt and the Swiss chard, and cook until bright green and wilted, about 3 minutes. Drain the chard and immediately dump it into the ice water to stop cooking. Drain again and squeeze dry (or spin in a salad spinner), then wring out in a clean dish towel to remove as much liquid as possible. Chop the dried chard very finely or pulse in a food processor (you should have about 2½ cups) and set aside.

In a small skillet over medium heat, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the onion and ¼ teaspoon salt and cook, stirring, until soft, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 40 seconds; set aside.

In a medium bowl, mix the Swiss chard, onion mixture, ricotta, and eggs to blend. Stir in the Parmesan, basil, ½ cup flour, 1¼ teaspoons salt, and pepper to taste. Cover and refrigerate for at least 4 and up to 24 hours.

Adjust the oven rack to the center position and heat the oven to 250 degrees. Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil over high heat. Line a large plate with paper towels. Spread the remaining flour on work surface. With wet hands gently roll 1-tablespoon portions of the chard mixture into about 32 oblong dumplings. Roll them in the flour and gently tap off the excess. Add 1 tablespoon salt and half the dumplings to the boiling water and cook until they float, 3 to 5 minutes. With a large slotted skimmer, very gently transfer the dumplings to the paper towels, blot dry, and place in the oven to stay warm. Return the water to a rolling boil and cook the remaining malfatti in the same manner. Serve at once with tomato sauce or melted butter and grated Parmesan. 

 

SAUTEED SWISS CHARD WITH GINGER AND TOMATOES

Makes about 6 cups

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 medium onion, halved and sliced

Salt and black pepper

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 tablespoon minced or grated ginger

½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 large bunches (about 2 pounds) Swiss chard, stems thinly sliced and leaves chopped

1 large tomato (about ¾ pound), cored, seeded, and chopped

In a very large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil until shimmering. Add the onion and ¼ teaspoon salt and saute, until soft, about 4 minutes. Add the garlic, 2 teaspoons of the ginger, and the red pepper flakes and saute 1 minute. Adjust the heat to medium-high, add the chard stems and 3 tablespoons of water, cover skillet, and cook, stirring occasionally, for 7 minutes. Add the chard leaves in batches, wilting one before adding the next, and cook until tender, about 7 minutes longer. Add the tomato, remaining ginger, 1 teaspoon salt, and black pepper to taste and cook, stirring, until tomato is heated through, about 1½ minutes. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and black pepper, if necessary, and serve hot or warm.

cooking@globe.com
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