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Style Watch

A Winchester family room gets a little office space, too

Heirlooms and sophisticated patterns transform this space that once scared off potential buyers.

Michael J. Lee

Michael J. Lee

When Becky Tellefsen was house hunting, the family room of one Winchester home discouraged other potential buyers. “The realtor told us that people would walk into the room, take one look at the wagon-wheel chandelier, wood-paneled walls, and threadbare rugs, and walk right out the front door,” says Tellefsen, who runs interior design firm Bryant Park Designs with Deb DePeter. “But I felt it was something we could work with.” With DePeter’s help, Tellefsen recently overhauled the room, which serves as both a family gathering spot and her home office. It’s now airy and inviting, with neutral walls, vibrant patterns, and modern textures. Best of all, says Tellefsen, are the family pieces incorporated into the design. “The things that have roots and meaning are very special to us.”

1. The Brunschwig & Fils fabric used for the roman shades was the jumping-off point for the room’s aesthetic. “It’s a traditional print that doesn’t feel too old-fashioned,” says Tellefsen.

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2. The settee was discovered on an antiquing expedition and reupholstered in Lee Jofa fabric; throw pillows pick up hues in the roman shades.

3. The lithograph depicting a mountain setting was created by Tellefsen’s husband’s great-grandfather, Harald Sohlberg; the original hangs in Norway’s national art museum.

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4. The sisal-and-chenille rug is durable — a must in a house with two young sons. “Since this is my work space, I wanted the room to look really nice and polished,” says Tellefsen, “but it has to be family-friendly, too.”

5. Traditional tub chairs inherited from Tellefsen’s grandmother were reupholstered in an indigo-and-cream Lee Jofa fabric.

6. The wooden buffet is a family heirloom from the 1800s.

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7. Two chairs — estate sale finds that were originally white — have a Quadrille zebra print on the back and blue velvet by Kravet on the front.

8. A new window in the work area fills the room with light.

9. A modern acrylic Pottery Barn Teen desk chair contrasts with a traditional guest chair placed opposite it.

10. A limed-oak desk with a lean profile is from Worlds Away.

11. Deb DePeter rescued the guest chair from the Winchester Transfer Station. “It had a feminine, sophisticated, dainty silhouette,” she recalls. The piece was reupholstered in red velvet, with raffia on the seat back.

12. A Crate & Barrel faux sheepskin rug adds a touch of fun.

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