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    Examiner

    Weighty data for losing weight in the new year

    The skinny on just how much Americans overindulge during the holidays, and how to burn it off.

    Associated Press

    > 32 — Percent of Americans whose New Year’s resolution is to lose weight

    > 30 — Minutes of daily exercise recommended at minimum for adults

    > 2,000 — Daily caloric intake standard used on nutrition labels (individual calorie needs vary by height, weight, age, and activity levels)

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    > 195.5 — Average weight of the American male 20 and older

    > 166.2 — Average weight of an American female 20 and older

    > 26 — Pounds gained annually by someone who eats 250 more calories a day than recommended without upping exercise levels

    > 250 — Calories in a 1.74-ounce package of peanut M&M’s, a small McDonald’s hamburger, or a 20-ounce Dunkin’ Donuts peppermint mocha hot coffee

    > 6,560 — Estimated number of calories Americans who celebrate Christmas consume that day

    WHAT DOES A 155-POUND PERSON BURN IN 30 MINUTES OF . . . ?

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    > Running at 6 miles per hour — 372 calories

    > Playing basketball — 298 calories

    > Sleeping — 23 calories

    > Watching TV — 28 calories

    > Sitting in meetings — 60 calories

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    > Grocery shopping — 130 calories

    > Shoveling snow — 223 calories

    > Ice Skating — 260 calories

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    WHAT DOES A 185-POUND PERSON BURN IN 30 MINUTES OF . . . ?

    > Running at 6 miles per hour — 444 calories

    > Playing basketball — 355 calories

    > Sleeping — 28 calories

    > Watching TV — 33 calories

    > Sitting in meetings — 72 calories

    > Grocery shopping — 155 calories

    > Shoveling snow — 266 calories

    >Ice Skating — 311 calories

    Sources: US Department of Health and Human Services; US Department of agriculture; Harvard Heart letter; ABC News; Centers for Disease Control; fame10.com; Nielsen