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Seeing the future of home security at Immedia Semiconductor

The Andover company expands beyond surveillance cameras and challenges industry leaders.

01/04/2016 LAS VEGAS, NV Immedia, a Boston-based startup, attended CES 2016 to market Blink, a home security wireless device that was funded by a Kickstarter campaign in summer 2014. (John M. Blodgett for the Boston Globe)

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Andover-based Immedia Semiconductor unveiled its battery-powered, Internet-connected Blink surveillance cameras in 2016.

In the blink of an eye, Immedia Semiconductor transformed itself from an obscure microchip design company to a rising star in home security and the much-hyped Internet of Things.

The Andover company unveiled its battery-powered, Internet-connected Blink surveillance cameras in 2016 and sold more than a quarter-million of them in its first year. Now the company is introducing a full line of security products in a bid to take on industry leaders ranging from venerable ADT Security Services to Boston’s own SimpliSafe.

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The transformation began in 2014 when Immedia engineers invented a chip capable of capturing high-definition video while using very little power. Instead of marketing the chip to other companies, Immedia decided to build it into a finished product and sell it.

After a year of glowing reviews and strong sales, security gear has become the primary focus for the company, which now does business under the Blink name. Later this year, it will roll out a host of new products. There’ll be a waterproof version of the camera as well as door and window sensors, a water sensor to detect leaky plumbing, and a cellular base station that can transmit warnings from Blink devices even when the home’s Internet access is cut off.

Says Don Shulsinger, the company’s vice president of sales and marketing, “We’re definitely in a growth mode.”

Hiawatha Bray is a Globe staff writer. Send comments to magazine@globe.com. Follow us on Twitter @BostonGlobeMag.
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