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Teen’s award-winning artwork stolen from Transportation Building

Chelmsford teen perplexed at loss for prize effort

Emily Moreau was recognized as an accomplished artist by the Boston Globe Scholastic Art & Writing Awards earlier this year. Last weekend, however, she joined the ranks of a number of artists worldwide when her artwork was stolen.

“My art teacher told me at the beginning of class yesterday afternoon,’’ said Moreau, a 16-year-old junior at Chelmsford High School. “I was baffled; it was the weirdest thing to hear.’’

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Moreau said she won a Silver Key award for a colored pencil drawing she has been calling “Breakfast.’’ She said the piece was a class assignment for which she was supposed to turn a food item into something surreal.

Moreau said she chose to draw a fried egg in a pan, but instead of a yolk, she drew an eyeball.

“It’s the weirdest piece,’’ she said. “I don’t know why someone would want to steal it.’’

State Police said they are investigating the theft of the 9-by-12-inch drawing from the State Transportation Building in Boston and that they are reviewing a surveillance video from the morning it was stolen.

John Michael Gray and Tim O’Connor, who oversee The Scholastic Art & Writing Awards for Massachusetts, declined to comment on the theft when reached by phone yesterday.

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Moreau said she did not have a chance to see her artwork on display at the Transportation Building, but said it was supposed to be available until at least the end of March. As far as a motive is concerned, the teen has a theory.

“I think it could have been a college student cramming for a piece and they saw it at the Transportation Building and it fit what they needed,’’ Moreau said. “I honestly don’t know.’’

Moreau said she has a digital copy of the artwork, so she will still be able to use the piece in her portfolio for college applications.

“I’m lucky enough to have a picture,’’ she said. “I don’t really know what to feel. I thought it was funny at first, but I just can’t get my head around it.’’

Colin A. Young can be reached at colin.young@globe.com.

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