Metro

MBTA worker saves 3-year-old’s stuffed animal from tracks

A photo of 3-year-old Riley Carey-Brown’s beloved stuffed animal, Nummy, a bunny. The photo was taken after Wednesday’s ordeal.

Casey Carey-Brown

A photo of 3-year-old Riley Carey-Brown’s beloved stuffed animal, Nummy, a bunny. The photo was taken after Wednesday’s ordeal.

Once upon a time, a stuffed bunny named Nummy fell out of its owner’s arms onto the scary subway tracks in Boston. But a kind Orange Line operator stopped his very large train and returned Nummy to the little girl.

MBTA officials and the girl’s mother say this storybook scenario actually happened at rush hour Wednesday, on the outbound tracks at the Green Street station in Jamaica Plain.

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Riley Carey-Brown, 3, “cannot stop laughing” about the rescue, according to her mother.

On Wednesday, the parents picked up their daughter from school. Near the end of the train ride on the way back to their home in Jamaica Plain, Riley’s world turned upside down. As the family exited the subway car at Green Street, Nummy fell between the train and platform.

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The train was packed. “You could hear this huge gasp,” Casey said Thursday.

Riley was inconsolable. Her parents were panicked. It was 5:30 p.m.

Casey found an MBTA customer service agent, who calmly radioed a colleague. The MBTA said later that in those tense moments, the alert was eventually relayed to Frank Limone, who was operating the next outbound train.

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Casey then saw the next subway car pull up a bit short. Then she saw Nummy “carefully placed” on the yellow-striped edge of the platform.

Limone had hopped out of his train and retrieved Nummy. “He sat it down, super cute, on the platform,” Casey said.

“These helpful and compassionate T employees demonstrated what public service is all about,” T general manager Jonathan Davis said.

Riley took Nummy to school again Thursday. She promised to hold on to her tighter.

Globe correspondent Alli Knothe contributed to this report.
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