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Bird sightings

Recent bird sightings as reported to the Massachusetts ­Audubon Society:

During the past week there was a trickle of kinglets, warblers, thrushes, towhees, gnatcatchers, swallows, and yellowlegs, but no big push of migrants. In the rarity department, the blue grosbeak which wintered at a feeding station in Merrimac is still making sporadic visits.

Princeton: At the Wachusett Meadow Wildlife Sanctuary, a yellow-throated warbler, a black-and-white warbler, a pine warbler, 30 palm warblers, 20 yellow-rumped warblers, 31 yellow-bellied sapsuckers, four barred owls, two broad-winged hawks, and a common raven.

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Bolton: At the Bolton Flats Wildlife Management Area, two blue-winged teal, 40 green-winged teal, an American bittern, two Virginia rails, three greater yellowlegs, a least sandpiper, and two Wilson’s snipe.

Duxbury: At Duxbury Beach, two American oystercatchers, two willets, an American woodcock, dunlin, and three harlequin ducks. There were two red crossbills at a feeding station.

Plymouth: At Manomet Point, at least one red phalarope, a red-necked phalarope, and six harlequin ducks.

Hanson: At Burrage Pond Wildlife Management Area, seven great egrets, a broad-winged hawk, four greater yellowlegs, two common ravens, 35 yellow-rumped warblers, 20 palm warblers, and 12 savannah sparrows.

Foxborough: At F. Gilbert Hills State Forest, three barred owls and a pair of common ravens with young at their nest.

Concord: Eight sparrow species at Kaveski Farm: white-crowned, white-throated, American tree, song, house, chipping, vesper, and savannah. At the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, 26 wood ducks, a blue-winged teal, two Northern shovelers, two green-winged teal, six Virginia rails, two American coots, two killdeer, three Wilson’s snipe, six chimney swifts, and seven blue-gray gnatcatchers.

Revere: At Revere Beach, nine manx shearwaters, four piping plovers, three American oystercatchers, and three ruddy turnstones.

Newbury: The Plum Island hawk watch tallied four osprey, eight Northern harriers, seven sharp-shinned hawks, three Cooper’s hawks, 108 American kestrels, and nine merlins.

Reading: Migrants at Reading Town Forest: a broad-winged hawk, two Virginia rails, seven chimney swifts, four Eastern phoebes, a winter wren, a blue-gray gnatcatcher, two palm and four pine warblers, and four swamp sparrows.

Miscellaneous: an early great-crested flycatcher at the Nahant Thicket Wildlife Sanctuary; rose-breasted grosbeaks in Haverhill and at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge; an American bittern at Mount Auburn; a brown thrasher in the Boston Public Garden; a summer tanager in Newbury; a common yellowthroat in Westborough; a black-throated green warbler and a Louisiana waterthrush in Oakham; a red phalarope at Bell’s Neck Conservation Area in Harwich; a willet in North Falmouth; a Northern parula at the Wellfleet Bay Wildlife Sanctuary; an early Baltimore oriole in Wilmington; and a probable collard Eurasian dove in Lowell.

For more information about bird sightings or to report sightings, call 781-259-8805 or go to www.massaudubon.org.
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