Metro

Birthplace of Abigail Adams reopens

With the addition of heat and air conditioning, the Abigail Adams house in Weymouth will hold programs year-round.

Pat Greenhouse/Globe Staff

With the addition of heat and air conditioning, the Abigail Adams house in Weymouth will hold programs year-round.

WEYMOUTH — Abigail Adams’s birthplace has reopened to the public after being closed for two years for major structural renovations.

The reopening Sunday of the Weymouth home, which was built in 1685, marks a new chapter in the Abigail Adams Historical Society’s mission to spread the story of the wife of the nation’s second president and mother of the sixth.

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‘‘We’re so thrilled everyone is coming back,’’ society president Judy Alukonis said as she welcomed visitors.

‘‘It has been overwhelming almost. We are concentrating today on telling people what has been done over the last two years, but then people ask questions and all of a sudden you have a tour group,” she said.

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With the addition of heat and air conditioning, the house will hold programs year-round and an ambitious lineup is ahead.

Adams once said that learning ‘‘is not attained by chance’’ but ‘‘must be sought for with ardor.’’ The society plans to follow her advice to the letter in its new programming to illuminate ‘‘key and little-known facts of Adams’s life and times.’’

Mary Pap, who lives nearby, visited the home with her husband and four children.

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‘‘She was so intelligent and really had a good sense of how to counsel her husband how to lead the nation at the very early stages of our country,’’ Pap told The Patriot Ledger.

Elizabeth Eaton drove from New Hampshire to visit her son and attend the reopening.

‘‘It has never been open when I drive by and I think she is fascinating, how she survived and what she did,’’ Eaton told the newspaper.

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