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Metro

Five-alarm Allston fire displaces 19

Paul Hoy, captain of the Red Cross Metro South Disaster Action Team, spoke with residents of Mansfield Street who were displaced by the fire.

JESSICA RINALDI FOR THE GLOBE

Paul Hoy, captain of the Red Cross Metro South Disaster Action Team, spoke with residents of Mansfield Street who were displaced by the fire.

Amadeo Garcia woke up Sunday morning to the sound of his wife yelling from another room in their Allston apartment. She was making her way to the shower when she saw the flames.

“She called to me, ‘Amadeo, fire!’ so I went to the second floor, the third floor to knock and tell people to get out,” said Garcia, 51, who has lived on the first floor of the three-decker at 17 Mansfield St. for eight years and helps maintain the property. “I left everything material behind. It was very important to help get everyone out.”

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Nineteen people, including a toddler, were displaced Sunday morning after a five-alarm fire tore through the wood-frame building, fire officials said.

The flames engulfed and collapsed porches at the rear of the building, and heat from the inferno melted the siding off a nearby home, according to Boston Fire Department spokesman Steve MacDonald.

One person was taken to a local hospital to be treated for smoke inhalation, MacDonald said, but no other injuries were reported.

Fires also struck residential complexes in Plymouth and Fall River over the weekend, sending three people to the hospital and leaving 48 people without homes, officials said.

In Allston, firefighters responded at 7:12 a.m. to reports of a fire at the three-decker, MacDonald said. When the first firefighters arrived, they called for a second alarm to be struck. The size of the blaze and its closeness to other homes elevated it to five alarms within 15 minutes, MacDonald said.

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But the bulk of the fire was put out by about 8 a.m.

“Our guys did a great job knocking the fire down and making sure that no one was inside the buildings,” said Deputy Chief Robert Calobrisi at the scene this morning.

Calobrisi said officials believe 19 people lived in the building — 18 adults and one child — and all were accounted for. The blaze may have caused about $500,000 in damage, Calobrisi estimated.

The cause of the fire and where it started were under investigation Sunday, MacDonald said.

The blaze was raised to a five-alarm fire so quickly, Calobrisi said, in part because it allowed the department to activate additional firefighters, who could help relieve others fighting the fire in temperatures near 85 degrees.

“There has been a five-day heat wave now, and that takes a considerable toll on the companies,” he said. “So you need additional manpower, and you need them to get hydrated and to rehab.”

The homes flanking 17 Mansfield St. were damaged by the heat. The synthetic siding of a Royal Street house that abuts the Mansfield Street building was melted off, MacDonald said.

Inspectors from the city’s Inspectional Services Department were on scene to assess the damage, MacDonald said. Inspectional Services officials could not be reached for comment. Officials were investigating whether working smoke detectors were in place, but residents from two units said detectors in their apartments went off as smoke began to fill the building.

Euzelia Souza, 29, had lived in the 17 Mansfield St. apartment building for about a month with her husband, Marcos and their 23-month-old daughter, Larissa. Her brother-in-law who has lived in the building for five years was treated for smoke inhalation, she said.

“My husband’s brother went to the kitchen and saw the smoke. He said ‘Fire, fire!’ ” Souza said. “So fast. The fire took everything.”

Paul Hoy, captain of the Red Cross Metro South Disaster Action Team, said Sunday morning that the Red Cross would help any residents who need a place to stay. “We will also provide money for clothes and money for food,” he said.

In April, a Boston University student died and 15 people were injured, including two other BU students and six firefighters, when a three-alarm blaze quickly spread through a house at 87 Linden St. in Allston, less than a mile from Mansfield Street. After an investigation, the owner of the Linden Street building was cited by city inspectors for running an illegal rooming house and for not obtaining permits needed to create bedrooms in the basement of the building.

In Plymouth on Sunday morning, 38 people were displaced after a fire ripped through a condo complex.

Firefighters responded to the three-alarm blaze at 4D Marc Drive at about 8:30 a.m., acccording to the Plymouth Fire Department. No injuries were reported.

Twelve units in the building were damaged and none of the residents were able to return to their homes Sunday. The Red Cross set up an emergency reception center at North Plymouth High School for about seven hours and arranged for the displaced residents to stay in a hotel Sunday night. The fire is under investigation.

And in Fall River, a large mixed-use building was a total loss after a strong blaze caused extensive damage late Saturday night, according to police.

The fire destroyed several apartments above a Portugese restaurant at 177 Columbia St., police Lieutenant Joseph T. Donnelly, Jr. said Sunday night.

Three residents were taken to a hospital for evaluation and may have suffered smoke inhalation, Donnelly said. The cause of the fire has not been determined.

Widespread fire and water damage made the building a total loss, Donnelly said. Three motor vehicles sustained substantial damage. Two of the eight apartments above the restaurant were vacant at the time of the fire, Donnelly said.

The Red Cross provided emergency help, a hotel stay, and cash assistance, for seven adults and three children from four families, according to Kat Powers, spokeswoman for the American Red Cross. Further details were not available Sunday night.

Jessica Rinaldi of the Globe photo staff and Globe correspondents Haven Orecchio-Egresitz, Chris Stick-Girard, and Matthew Higgins contributed to this report. Colin A. Young can be reached at Colin.young@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @ColinAYoung.

Jessica Rinaldi of the Globe photo staff and Globe correspondents Haven Orecchio-Egresitz, Chris Stick-Girard, and Matthew Higgins contributed to this report. Colin A. Young can be reached at Colin.young@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @ColinAYoung.

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