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The Boston Globe

Metro

Bird Sightings

Recent sightings as reported by the Massachusetts Audubon Society:

The several cool nights with accompanying northwest winds last week resulted in the appearance of small numbers of newly arrived migrants, especially warblers, from a number of scattered localities. These conditions should produce more and more migrants with every passing cold front.

Plum Island: at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, a northern shoveler, an American bittern, three American golden plovers, 40 white-rumped sandpipers, four stilt sandpipers, two peregrine falcons, a western kingbird, three brown thrashers, and several species of warblers including an orange-crowned warbler and a Canada warbler.

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Concord: at the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, seven great egrets, three snowy egrets, a little blue heron, two black-crowned night-herons, a glossy ibis, a sora, two solitary sandpipers, a Wilson’s snipe, and a peregrine falcon. At the Kaveski Farm, two buff-breasted sandpipers .

Halifax/Middleboro: In the Cumberland Farms fields, 35 killdeer, six black-bellied plovers, a pectoral sandpiper, and 50 bobolinks.

Westport: Among morning migrants at Gooseberry Neck: a peregrine falcon; five veeries; a variety of warblers including a northern waterthrush, 14 American redstarts, two Cape Mays, seven northern parulas, 12 yellows, two blackpolls, four prairies, a Canada, and a Wilson’s; two scarlet tanagers; five rose-breasted grosbeaks; a dickcissel; 26 bobolinks; and five Baltimore orioles.

South Dartmouth: At Allens Pond, 55 great egrets, 23 snowy egrets, and 29 glossy ibises were seen leaving a roost.

Miscellaneous: a whimbrel and a Baird’s sandpiper at Nahant; a Swainson’s hawk that was banded at a hawk banding station in Carver; small numbers of migrating common nighthawks at several locations; and a Connecticut warbler in Reading.

For more information or to report sightings, call 781-259-8805 or visit massaudubon.org
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