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Ex-Children’s doctor gets 6½ years on child porn charges

Richard Keller

Richard Keller

A tearful Richard Keller, a former doctor who worked at Phillips Academy in Andover and at Boston Children’s Hospital, was sentenced Wednesday to 6½ years in federal prison on child pornography charges.

Keller, 57, must also pay a $10,000 fine and serve 5½ years of probation after his release. As part of his probation, he must undergo counseling and stay away from children without an adult present, among other conditions.

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Standing to address the judge, Keller appeared to struggle to control his emotions. He said he was embarrassed for himself, his friends, and his family, “who have been forced to bear a burden of confusion, betrayal, of shame and profound sorrow.”

He acknowledged that he had been living in a “heinous and vile subculture.”

“The hypocrisy of my behavior is not lost on me, for I betrayed a public trust,” he said.

Keller, the father of a 2-year-old, is in a romantic relationship with a woman and said he recognized his wrongdoing and wanted to make amends, perhaps by becoming an advocate for the “poor, disenfranchised, the helpless” after his release.

“Please know I have done much good in my life, and I have a good heart,” he said.

His lawyer, Max Stern, also told US District Court Judge F. Dennis Saylor IV that his client did not want to minimize the seriousness of his crimes, but that he was apologetic and somewhat liberated by his arrest.

“He has had a tortured existence, an agonizing existence,” Stern said. “He calls it a tumor. . . . Now he is free to face his demons.”

The case was brought under the federal Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative begun in 2006 by the US Department of Justice to target, among other child abusers, people who fuel the underground child pornography market.

“Any crime that preys upon children, the most vulnerable and precious population, is reprehensible,” US Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said in a statement.

“But when the predator is in a position of trust, as Mr. Keller was as a pediatrician, it is particularly disturbing. The US attorney’s office will continue to work alongside our law enforcement partners to unveil the cloak of anonymity that these defendants seem to think the Internet provides them.”

Keller pleaded guilty in November to three charges of receiving and possessing child pornography for obtaining pictures and videos of boys ages 7 to 16 engaged in sexually explicit conduct.

He had some of it shipped to him at the student health center at Andover, where he worked for 19 years as medical director.

Keller resigned from Andover in April 2011 after school officials said they would not renew his contract.

John Palfrey, head of school at the academy, said in an e-mail to students and parents after Keller’s arrest in September 2012 that Keller had been reprimanded in 1999 for using a school computer to get access to adult pornography and had shown an inappropriate cartoon to students in 2002. Palfrey said he had no reason to believe that students were affected by Keller’s crimes.

Keller had also worked as a pediatric endocrinologist at Children’s Hospital in Boston and taught part time at Harvard Medical School.

He voluntarily surrendered his state medical license after his arrest. Children’s Hospital and Phillips Academy. Andover did not respond to calls seeking comment.

Keller’s case originated in an investigation into an unnamed Toronto company suspected of making child pornography movies.

Authorities found Keller’s name and $2,695 in orders for more than 50 titles sent to two addresses for him: a post office box and the student health center at Phillips. Keller made purchases on a total of 19 occasions, prosecutors said.

Authorities later searched Keller’s house and found high-gloss printouts and DVDs of child pornography.

Assistant US Attorney Stacy Dawson Belf acknowledged Keller’s years of helping children, but said his purchases of child pornography had hurt children.

“Obviously, child pornography is a terrible crime that not only victimizes these children” portrayed in the images, but encourages the crime by creating a market for such materials, she said.

“Dr. Keller paid for this, providing an economic incentive to harm children,” she said.

Milton J. Valencia can be reached at MValencia@
globe.com
. Follow him on Twitter @MiltonValencia
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