Metro

Transparency pledge left out of Olympics document, report says

A conceptual rendering of an Olympic stadium.

Boston 2024

A conceptual rendering of an Olympic stadium.

When supporters in Boston asked the US Olympic Committee to consider their bid for the 2024 Summer Games, they promised to be open with the public about what the event would cost.

Yet, according to a report in Boston Magazine, that pledge of fiscal transparency was among the items left out when the group Boston 2024 made its bid documents public in January.

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The publication this week posted what it described as a full version of Boston’s bid documents, and noted that omission.

Some information about the financing of the bid was also missing, according to multiple reports, including a proposal that the city finance land and infrastructure costs at Widett Circle, which would host a temporary Olympic stadium, by issuing tax increment financing bonds.

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“Given recent media reports about large scale sporting events and the financial impacts on their host communities, people in Massachusetts and Boston are in need of a realistic education about the costs of the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games,” reads a passage from the document posted this week.

There is another pledge of openness in the documents previously made public by Boston 2024, though it does not make specific reference to cost.

“Boston 2024 remains ready and looks forward to working with the USOC and elected government leaders to ensure an open, honest and transparent public outreach campaign throughout the bid process.”

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Also on the Boston 2024 website is an economic study by the UMass Donahue Institute. A preface to that document discusses the “necessary wide-ranging civic discussion” surrounding the Games, and says the study reflects neither an “economic slam dunk,” nor the “disaster scenarios painted by some.”

Andy Rosen can be reached at andrew.rosen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter at @andyrosen.
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