Metro

Aaron Hernandez settles civil lawsuit in Florida

FILE - In this Thursday, April 9, 2015, file photo, former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez, right, sits with defense attorney Charles Rankin, left, before the jury began deliberations in his murder trial in Fall River, Mass. Hernandez was convicted of murder and sentenced to life imprisonment for the 2013 shooting death of Odin Lloyd. The story was a top news item in Massachusetts in 2015. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, Pool, File)

Steven Senne/AP/pool/FILE 2015

Former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez (right) sat with defense attorney Charles Rankin (left) before the jury began deliberations in his murder trial in Fall River, Mass.

Aaron Hernandez has settled a lawsuit in Florida brought by an associate who claimed that the former NFL star and convicted murderer shot him in the face, court records show.

Lawyers for Alexander Bradley, a former friend of Hernandez, wrote in a court filing in federal court in Miami on Friday that “this matter has been settled.” Terms of the settlement were not disclosed, and attorneys for both men could not be reached for comment late Friday night.

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Bradley, of Connecticut, had alleged in court papers that Hernandez shot him in the eye in February 2013 in Florida after the two had argued at a nightclub.

He has been granted immunity in Hernandez’s upcoming double murder trial in Suffolk Superior Court in Boston. Authorities say Bradley was with Hernandez when he fatally shot Daniel de Abreu, 28, and Safiro Furtado, 29, in Boston’s South End in July 2012.

Hernandez, 26, is already serving a life sentence for the June 2013 fatal shooting of Odin L. Lloyd, 27, of Dorchester. He was convicted of first-degree murder in that case last April, and an appeal will be heard before the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

The once-celebrated professional athlete also faces wrongful death lawsuits from the families of Lloyd, de Abreu, and Furtado.

Travis Andersen can be reached at tandersen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TAGlobe.
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