Metro

Police Commissioner Evans runs Marathon for first time since bombing

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans was congratulated after finishing the 121st Boston Marathon.
Charles Krupa/Associated Press
Boston Police Commissioner William Evans was congratulated after finishing the 121st Boston Marathon.

Boston Police Commissioner William B. Evans ran the Boston Marathon Monday for the first time since 2013, when the inveterate runner completed the race and then, after the terror bombs went off, returned to help lead the response.

Evans, 58, said he felt like he could get out on the course this year because police “had a good plan” in place, and him getting back on the course showed that the city had moved beyond the tragedy. He ran the 26.2 mile race in three hours and fifty minutes.

“My department does a great job without me and I had all the confidence in the world with them,” he said.

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He said he recently bought a cellphone holder, and carried his phone with him, in case, “heaven forbid,” something did happen.

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“I didn’t want to be out of the loop,” he said.

Evans was superintendent in charge of the Bureau of Field Services at the time of the twin blasts near the finish line that killed three people and wounded more than 260 others. He took over from former commissioner Edward F. Davis in late 2013.

He said he felt the heat during Monday’s race.

“It was hot. It was hot. You know, these don’t get any easier. The older you get they seem to get harder,” he said.

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“You say, ‘What am I doing this for?’ But you know, honestly, it’s the first chance I’ve gotten to run after the bombing. You know, you run it for the young victims here, tragically four years ago. Even though your legs are getting sore and what-not, when you think of the families and the victims it keeps you going pretty strong.”

Evans said the energy from the crowd was unbelievable.

“Great, great day,” he said. “A little hot.”

It was his 52nd marathon, and his 19th in Boston.

The bombers set off two blasts. They also killed an MIT police officer several days later. One bomber, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed in a confrontation with police. His brother, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, is on federal death row.

Steve Annear can be reached at steve.annear@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @steveannear.