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Star witness in Hernandez trial drops lawsuit against CNN

Alexander Bradley testifies during former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez's double murder trial in Suffolk Superior Court, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Boston. Hernandez is on trial for the July 2012 killings of Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado who he encountered in a Boston nightclub. The former New England Patriots NFL football player is already serving a life sentence in the 2013 killing of semi-professional football player Odin Lloyd. (Pat Greenhouse /The Boston Globe via AP, Pool)

Pat Greenhouse/globe staff

Alexander Bradley testified during former New England Patriots football player Aaron Hernandez's double murder trial in Suffolk Superior Court.

The star prosecution witness in the double murder trial of Aaron Hernandez has dropped a related lawsuit against CNN, according to a legal document filed Tuesday.

Alexander Bradley, the witness, and CNN have agreed to “stipulate to the Voluntary Dismissal, with prejudice, of all claims against [CNN],” said a brief filing in US District Court in Connecticut, where Bradley had initially filed his suit against the cable news giant in November.

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Tuesday’s filing did not say why Bradley agreed to dismiss the lawsuit, and his lawyer could not be reached for comment. A spokeswoman for CNN also could not be reached.

Bradley had alleged in the suit that CNN aired images of him recovering from a gunshot wound in a Florida hospital without his permission in a 2015 documentary entitled “Downward Spiral: Inside the Case Against Aaron Hernandez.”

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The 34-year-old Bradley testified against Hernandez, a former New England Patriots star, at his trial in March. He told jurors he was driving Hernandez’s Toyota 4Runner on July 16, 2012 when the athlete reached across him and fired into a BMW at a stop light in Boston, killing Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado.

Bradley, currently jailed in Connecticut for shooting up a Hartford club in 2014, also testified that Hernandez shot him in the face in Florida in February 2013. A Suffolk County jury acquitted Hernandez on April 14 of murdering de Abreu and Furtado and also cleared him of a witness intimidation charge for the alleged shooting of Bradley.

Hernandez, 27, hanged himself five days after his acquittal in his prison cell in Shirley, where he was serving a life sentence for the June 2013 murder of Odin Lloyd. A Bristol County judge on Tuesday threw out Hernandez’s murder conviction the Lloyd case, since he died before the state’s highest court could hear his appeal.

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Bradley had also sued Hernandez in federal court in Florida over the alleged shooting in that state, and the two settled last year. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

In addition, Bradley in February sued St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach, where he was treated after the Florida shooting, and the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office, which closed its investigation of the incident after Bradley initially refused to cooperate with authorities.

Bradley’s attorneys said in the February lawsuit that the hospital possibly allowed sheriff’s deputies to photograph him without his consent while he was lying unconscious. One of those images later aired in the CNN documentary. The lawsuit against the hospital and sheriff's office is still pending, court records show.

Bradley, who testified for Suffolk prosecutors under an immunity deal, is scheduled to be released from prison in Connecticut no later than February 3, 2019.

Travis Andersen can be reached at tandersen@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @TAGlobe.
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