Metro

Where’s Trump’s portrait? Not in any federal buildings

A great place to hang a portrait.

There’s a big empty space on the wall above the information desk at the Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. Federal Building near North Station. At the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse, two lonely hooks protrude from the wall near the elevators.

Portraits of President Trump could not be found hanging at federal buildings in Boston on Tuesday morning. Nearly eight months into his controversial presidency, there were blank spaces in the usual prominent places where the president’s portrait is typically displayed.

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The Washington Post reports that, in a surprising twist for a president who is such a showman, the missing portraits are a national phenomenon. They haven’t been hung in thousands of federal courthouses, laboratories, military installations, ports of entry, and US embassies.

The Government Printing Office has not printed, and the General Services Administration, which manages federal buildings, has not distributed, the photos because the photos have not been sent to the GPO from the White House, the Post reported.

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One presidential historian suggested the administration isn’t participating because Trump wants to maintain his distance from the federal bureaucracy.

Patrick J. Sclafani, a spokesman for the New England region of the GSA, confirmed Tuesday there were no Trump portraits in federal buildings in the region.

Some agencies have improvised and put up a photo on the wall, anyway, the Post reported.

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While there was no portrait on the first level of the Joseph Moakley Federal Courthouse, there was one upstairs, in the US attorney’s office.

Better than nothing? The Post reports that some agencies are downloading this picture and putting it on the wall.

Maria Cramer of the Globe staff contributed to this report.
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