Metro

Here’s a look at every New England city that wants Amazon’s new headquarters

Plenty of communities around the region are entering the nationwide competition to land Amazon’s second headquarters, which the company says will eventually employ up to 50,000 workers.

With bids due to Amazon on Thursday, some communities have already submitted their pitches to the e-commerce giant, while others are finalizing their proposals.

Check out the map below and click the star symbols for more information about communities that have already submitted a bid or say they plan to do so.

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You can also scroll through the list below the map to see the details.

(Note: We’ll be updating the information here as we get it. If you hear of other places other than the ones listed that have submitted bids or plan to, let us know and we’ll add them.)

Green stars indicate communities that say they’ve submitted their bid.

Red stars show places that have said previously they were at least considering submitting one.

Boston

 Status: Submitted bid

 Boston, seen as a strong contender on the national stage, submitted a 218-page pitch that leans hard on the region’s intellectual firepower and offers up Suffolk Downs as a site whose ease of development outweighs its distance from the heart of the city.

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 The soon-to-close 161-acre Suffolk Downs horse track property in East Boston and Revere is located alongside two Blue Line stops. The bid was filed in partnership with the city of Revere. Other potential sites around Boston receive brief roundups.

 While some cities have dangled big tax breaks — $500 million from Worcester, $7 billion from New Jersey and the city of Newark — Boston barely mentions them, for now at least.

 “Boston sells itself,” Mayor Martin J. Walsh said Thursday. “The fact that we have had so much growth in the last few years here . . . is important. We have world-class colleges and universities. We’re the youngest city per capita in America.”

 The bid envisions improvements to Route 1A and harbor ferries to improve access to the Suffolk Downs site, and reviving plans to connect the Blue and Red Lines in downtown Boston to better link East Boston to southern parts of the city and Cambridge.

 Accompanying the bid was a letter from Governor Charlie Baker that touted the attributes of all Massachusetts, such as the state’s roster of colleges and universities and its innovation economy. Baker’s letter steered clear of highlighting Boston specifically. It reflects his strategy of supporting the numerous bids from across the state equally.

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For more info, click here, here, here, here, and here.

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Fall River area

 Status: Submitted bid

 This proposal centers around the Southcoast Technology Park, a 95-acre site where Amazon already has a distribution center in Fall River. Additional space would be available about a half-mile away in the 406-acre Riverfront Business Park in neighboring Freetown, according to a copy of the bid.

 Ken Fiola, executive vice president of the Fall River Office of Economic Development, told the Globe the city submitted its bid Wednesday and Fall River has a unique advantage: “We have a track record of working with Amazon and delivering developable sites on time for them,” he said. And, “a lot of communities just don’t have the landmass that we do.”

 Fall River, a former mill city, has struggled economically in recent years. But Fiola said that it can still draw from the “strong workforce throughout Massachusetts as well as neighboring Rhode Island.” The city also expects to have commuter rail service up and running by 2022.

 Fiola said the bid would include financial incentives. At a minimum, the city would offer the same deal it did for Amazon’s existing distribution center: 15 years of free municipal real estate taxes. He said if Fall River moves further in the process it would work to help hash out a deal for additional state-level incentives.

 Fiola also said the city did not send Amazon any gifts or try other quirky tactics to get their attention, as some other places around the country have done. “Amazon is a no-nonsense kind of company. They’re not going to be swayed by gimmicks,” he said.

For more info, click here and here.

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Foxborough

 Status: Expected to bid

 Officials in this town told The Sun Chronicle newspaper that they are considering making a pitch to Amazon. There are about 200 acres of available land — parking lots owned by the Kraft Group — across the street from Gillette Stadium and Patriot Place that has been eyed for development in the past.

 Town Manager William Keegan told the publication that the site along Route 1 offers upgraded utilities and easy access to key highways. The MBTA also plans to soon launch a pilot program to have commuter rail trains pick up and drop off passengers next to the stadium.

For more info, click here.

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Leominster

 Status: Submitted bid

 Mayor Dean Mazzarella said his small, former factory city in north central Massachusetts submitted its bid to Amazon earlier this week focused on two possible locations off of Interstate 190: one a former landfill and the other a 100-acre parcel. He said the bid offers Amazon $405 million in tax-based incentives, though the town would still reap $1 billion in new tax revenue.

 The city also submitted aerial footage of the town shot by a drone, and officials sent a suitcase to Amazon filled with various items made in Leominster, including blankets, signs, memorabilia, cookies, and food, he said. Why a suitcase? Amazon officials could use the suitcase and its contents for when they come to visit Leominster to iron out the details of building their second headquarters there, Mazzarella said confidently.

 “I feel really good,” Mazzarella said by phone Wednesday. “After looking at the details of what they’re looking for. We’re a perfect match. It’s incredible.” He said Amazon’s request for proposals “was to the T, tailor-made for our city.” He added: “This is a city of innovation. It always has been since the plastics industry.”

 He said the city’s bid “is built on sustainability, access to colleges and to medical institutions in the Boston area, transportation is huge, and affordability is huge. You get everything you get in Boston but it’s a heck of a lot cheaper,” said Mazzarella.

For more info, click here and here.

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Lowell area

 Status: Submitted bid

 The 130-acre Riverview Technology Park that straddles Billerica and Tewksbury and the similarly-sized Baker Commodities greenfield site are the centerpieces of this multi-community bid, according to a copy of the proposal.

 Neighboring Lowell is a partner in this bid. Its offerings include the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Middlesex Community College. Amazon has said it wants its second headquarters to be near a strong university system.

 Billerica Town Manager John Curran said the bid will be built on the idea that costs are lower than in Boston, but Amazon can still enjoy all the benefits of the city. You can’t look at this as you are going to Billerica,” he said. “You are coming to what the whole region has to offer.”

For more info, click here and here.

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Lynn

 Status: Submitted bid

 The Economic Development & Industrial Corp., the city’s development bank, submitted a bid Thursday proposing more than 100 acres of property along the Lynnway, according to The Daily Item newspaper of Lynn.

 The proposal included up to $500 million in tax credits over 20 years and another $8.3 million for the creation of open space and parks along the water, the publication reported.

The North Shore community is only about 10 miles from downtown Boston, and state officials have looked in recent years for ways to try to revitalize its waterfront.

For more info, click here and here.

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Marlborough area

Status: Submitted bid

This 73-page bid is a partnership of five abutting communities: the city of Marlborough, and the towns of Hudson, Northborough, Southborough, and Westborough.

The group is offering Amazon a network of 10 development sites that they say offer a total of 6.6 million square feet of office and research and development space, according to a copy of the bid.

“We are strategically located between the two largest cities in New England – Boston and Worcester, Massachusetts – providing easy access to every asset and amenity that Massachusetts and New England have to offer,” the bid says.

For more info, click here.

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Merrimack Valley area

 Status: Submitted bid

 North Andover, Andover, Haverhill, Lawrence and Methuen teamed up for this regional bid centered Osgood Landing, a 168-acre parcel along the Merrimack River at the site of the former AT&T/Lucent Technologies manufacturing complex. The communities say they have another 55 parcels, or 860 acres of space, available, too.

 Officials have talked up the property as having proximity to Boston (within 30 miles), being close to two international airports (Logan and Manchester in New Hampshire), and being near commuter rail stations. Discussions have also begun to build a rail station on-site, the bid says.

 The bid, entitled “let’s get merri’d,” is sprinkled with jokes and written in the theme of a marriage proposal. “Amazon... we’ve known you for 23 years, and in that time, we’ve grown to love and respect you,” the bid starts. “Not just for your great products and services, but for what’s inside you. Your spirit. Your vision. Your soul. You are the company we want to build our future with. You make us a better region...”

 The bid offers local financial incentives and says more may be available from the state. It also says the region’s transit authority is open to creating a separate bus operation specifically for Amazon workers.

For more info, click here, here, here, and here.

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New Bedford

 Status: Submitted bid

 The city of New Bedford formally entered the competition with a 44-page bid centered around redeveloping a city-owned golf course. The 110-acre site sits by two major highways, has direct freight rail access and is half-mile from a regional airport, according to a copy of New Bedford’s bid. The city did not outline specific tax incentives but indicated it would work on a package.

 This economically struggling mill city does not offer much public transit (no commuter rail), and it’s hardly known as a tech center. Still, that’s not stopping Mayor Jonathan Mitchell from pitching the virtues of being in New Bedford.

 New Bedford, an hour south of Boston, is pitching itself as a place that offers city living without the high cost. The bid also highlights the old whaling city’s proximity to Providence, about half hour away, where it can also draw tech talent.

 “Throughout our history, we have been a city that thinks big and embraces change,” Mitchell wrote in a letter to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. “In that spirit, we believe that New Bedford would offer a compelling place for Amazon to establish its second headquarters. More specifically, we offer for your consideration what is perhaps the most marketable greenfield site in the Northeast.”

For more info, click here and here.

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Somerville area

 Status: Expected to bid

 Though neighboring Boston is already submitting a bid, Somerville plans to submit its own. Somerville officials have talked with their counterparts in Boston and Cambridge in preparing their bid, but neither city is formally joining the proposal.

 The proposal would string Amazon buildings along the Orange Line from Assembly Row in Somerville, to Sullivan Square in Charlestown, to the mixed-use NorthPoint campus in Cambridge, to a planned office building at North Station.

 Somerville Mayor Joe Curtatone believes a regional approach is best. The bid he’s put together includes sites in Somerville, Cambridge, and Boston, roughly along the MBTA’s Orange Line. The goal is to leverage the assets — including the workforce — in all three cities. “We’re not miles apart here,” Curtatone told the Globe. “We see our entire region as an incredible opportunity.”

For more info, click here.

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Taunton

 Status: Submitted bid

 Mayor Thomas Hoye Jr. told the Globe Thursday that the city presented Amazon with a bid to build at the 140-acre site of the struggling Silver City Galleria mall.

 He said the site has access to major highways, is centrally located between Boston and Providence, and is near the spot where officials have long pushed for a new commuter rail line. “It’s an area that’s primed for redevelopment,” Hoye said. “We’re optimistic that Amazon will at least consider us.”

 Hoye said the bid does not include specifics on financial incentives but the city would offer local tax breaks and would work with the company to try and secure incentives from the state. “Our business-friendly reputation speaks for itself,” he said.

 Taunton is one of about two dozen communities in Massachusetts defined by state officials as a “gateway city” in part because of below-average income and educational attainment rates.

For more info, click here.

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Weymouth area

 Status: Submitted bid

 This bid centers around Union Point, a 1,550-acre former Naval Air Station, that straddles Abington, Rockland, and Weymouth. The site, which has had its share of fits and starts and change in ownership, might finally be ready for prime time under developer LStar Ventures.

 “This new, urban center will provide Amazon with easy access to Boston - one of the greatest cities in the world - while alleviating many of the challenges associated with it, including high housing costs, long commutes, and lengthy permitting timelines,” a copy of the 63-page bid says.

 The bid includes a unique financial incentive offer. In addition to other local and state incentives, “For every dollar that Amazon pledges over the next decade to charities or community organizations in the region that serve our most vulnerable populations (the homeless, the disabled, local schools, veterans, opioid addiction, job training, etc.), we will credit two dollars toward the purchase price of the land at Union Point,” the bid says. “This incentive program allows Amazon to secure 100 acres of pad-ready, developable land (valued at $400 million) at a deeply discounted-potentially free-cost.”

 “We have spent two and half years planning for this moment,” Kyle Corkum, chief executive and managing partner of LStar Ventures, which owns Union Point, told the Globe recently. “Our vision was that we would be the Silicon Valley of the East Coast.”

For more info, click here and here.

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Worcester

 Status: Submitted bid

The City of Worcester is digging deep to woo an Amazon headquarters, with a proposal to offer up to $500 million in local property tax breaks. The incentive package would be spread out over 20 years, according to a copy of the 60-page bid, released Tuesday night.

Worcester, the state’s second-largest city after Boston, is proposing that Amazon take over three parcels totaling 98 acres along Route 20. A commuter rail line runs along the property, but a station would need to be built. The privately owned land is zoned for manufacturing, though the city indicated it can be rezoned for commercial use, such as for offices.

The bid aims to position Worcester as a low-cost tech-hub alternative. Technology talent can be drawn from the city’s nine college and universities, most notably Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The bid highlights how the cost of living in Worcester is lower than in Boston and Seattle.

 Newton mayor and Democratic candidate for governor Setti Warren has said that he supports a Worcester bid over others in Massachusetts, arguing it would do the most to ease economic inequality in the state.

Nearby, officials from five small central Massachusetts towns — Douglas, Millbury, Sutton, Northbridge, and Uxbridge — met recently to consider a regional bid, according to the Worcester Telegram & Gazette. But, Douglas Town Administrator Matthew J. Wojcik told the Globe they decided against bidding. “It was an overwhelming project for a group of small towns like ours to put together in that amount of time, and we might have been lacking some of the key elements that Amazon was looking for,” he said.

For more, click here, here, here, and here.

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Bridgeport and New Haven areas, Conn.

 Status: Submitted bid

 This bid covers the area around both Bridgeport and New Haven, a region with pockets of poverty as well as prosperity. Bridgeport Mayor Joseph P. Ganim said that officials from other cities and towns around Bridgeport and New Haven, and from other institutions, like colleges and community groups, were also involved in the bid process.

 Ganim told the Globe the bid was submitted Monday, the first day Amazon began accepting bids. “We wanted to put not only a compelling bid in, but also to show that we’re nimble and we can move quickly.”

 He said the area offers proximity to the major cities of New York and Boston, major highways, commuter rail and ferry service, and airports. There’s also a strong workforce and university presence, including Yale and Sacred Heart universities, he said.

 Plus Amazon could have a much bigger impact there than it could in a larger city. “It could redefine this area.” Ganim said the bid includes “substantial” offers of direct and indirect financial incentives, but he said he thinks that will be only one factor in Amazon’s decision.

 This was one of 17 proposals from local communities in Connecticut that went before a state-level agency in recent weeks. The agency picked two proposals to pitch as a single bid to Amazon: one from the Hartford area and another from the Stamford area, according to the Courant. (More on the state-backed bid below.) But proposals not chosen by the state can still bid directly to Amazon, and some, including Bridgeport-area officials, have done that.

For more info, click here and here.

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Danbury, Conn.

 Status: Submitted bid

 Danbury made a direct pitch to Amazon this week, despite the state’s decision to throw its weight behind the Hartford and Stamford areas.

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton told the Globe in an e-mail that the bid highlights “the Greater Danbury area and eastern New York.” He said the bid proposes building the headquarters at the site of the former Union Carbide headquarters.

Stephen Nocera, director of project excellence for city, told the Globe by phone that the bid highlights Danbury’s proximity to major highways and airports as well as being near two major cities: New York and Boston. “But we’re not as expensive as those places.” He added: “We’re pretty excited about our talent pool.”

 The Danbury area boasts one of the strongest economies in the state, according to a recent report in The News-Times of Danbury. Officials there also planned to cite the city’s economic and job growth and efficient permitting process as part of their bid.

 Boughton tweeted a picture of a gift the town planned to send to Amazon as part of its bid — an ornamental key affixed to a plaque that read, “Key to Amazon HQ2.” He also recently posted a video message to Amazon on social media that tries to make the case for the city. Nocera said the city sent a copy of that video with its bid.

For more info, click here and here.

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Enfield, Conn.

 Status: Submitted bid

 This suburban town’s proposal, which will be submitted Thursday, centers around three sites: the Enfield Square Mall, space in a town center, and a nearby industrial park, said Mike Ciriello, director of development service for Enfield. Its proposal does not have state backing.

 Ciriello said the bid advertises advantages of being along a stretch from Amherst, Mass., south to the Hartford and New Haven areas that officials here call the “Knowledge Corridor,” for the region’s educated workforce as well as colleges, including UMass Amherst, UConn, and Yale.

 The area’s offerings also include affordability, easy access to major highways, proximity to Bradley International Airport, and plans to build commuter rail service connecting Springfield to New Haven, Ciriello said. It’s also not far to two major cities. “Why choose just Boston or New York City when you can have both,” he said.

He said that officials Springfield and other Western Massachusetts that had previously considered submitting their own bid to Amazon, instead decided to back Enfield’s proposal.

For more info, click here, here, and here.

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Hartford and Stamford areas, Conn.

 Status: Submitted bid

 This is the lone bid out of Connecticut that has the state’s backing and includes sites in the Hartford and Stamford areas. A copy of the bid says there are 14 available sites in the Stamford area centered around the city’s transportation center, and other sites in the Hartford area on either side of the Connecticut River.

 Governor Dannel P. Malloy posted a video on social media Thursday pitching his state to Amazon. He said in a statement the state offers a strong talent pool and educational institutions and is already “home to cutting-edge industries that are in the growth and innovation sectors.”

 State officials said the financial incentive package with the bid “will include direct incentives for Amazon, as well as funding to support needed investments in communities benefiting from Amazon’s growth.” But officials said they are “not providing any details regarding financial assistance in order to preserve the ability to enter into direct negotiations with the company.”

 The state also posted a website, www.ctisprime.com, with details about the bid.

For more info, click here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

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Brunswick, Maine

 Status: Submitted bid

 Steve Levesque, executive director of the Midcoast Regional Redevelopment Authority, told the Globe that he and his colleagues, along with officials from the state and the town of Brunswick, will submit a bid Wednesday proposing that Amazon build at the former Naval Air Station Brunswick, which is being redeveloped.

 There’s 175 acres of available space there, and the site, now called Brunswick Landing, is already home to an outpost of another major e-commerce company, home-goods seller Wayfair. Levesque said the site also offers open space and a “unique opportunity” for Amazon to do research and development, including for the company’s plans to use drones to deliver packages.

 Brunswick is “not an urban center, but we’re a very livable community on the coast of Maine,” including in terms of affordability, traffic, and recreational offerings, he said. There’s an Amtrak line that connects to Boston, and it’s only about a two-hour drive from Boston, he added.

 Levesque said the bid will offer some financial incentives but not at the scale other communities plan to offer. “Our programs are modest, but they’ve been successful in attracting major companies, like Wayfair.”

For more info, click here.

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Scarborough, Maine

 Status: Submitted bid

 This small town of fewer than 20,000 people just south of Portland will submit a bid Thursday offering about 300 acres of property around a horse racing track, town manager Thomas Hall told the Globe. “Why not,” he said.

 “We recognize that we fall short — in some cases woefully short — in Amazon’s expectations, but we do have is 300 acres of developable greenfield space and really a blank canvas,” said Hall. “One of the things that’s given us the confidence to go forward with this is . . . there’s a great amount of interest in this property and it’s development potential.”

 Hall said the town also offers proximity to Portland, Seacoast region of New Hampshire, and the Greater Boston area. He said the bid will note existing financial incentive opportunities from the state and will indicate a willingness to have conversations about additional incentives.

 Even if Scarborough is not picked, Hall said the process of putting together the bid was “a really healthy and important exercise.”

For more info, click here.

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Londonderry, New Hampshire

 Status: Submitted bid

 Governor Chris Sununu and other state and local officials on Wednesday announced that this bid will center around a 603-acre, shovel-ready greenfield site near Interstate 93 in Londonderry called Woodmont Commons, according a press release and a copy of the bid.

 The bid seeks to convince Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos to locate his new facility here, starting with the headline, “All the benefits of Boston without all the headaches.” But the bid also takes pains to remind Amazon that New Hampshire is actually very close to Boston. “As part of the regional metro-Boston area, southern New Hampshire offers all the benefits typically associated with major metro areas yet maintains the advantages of being in a truly enterprise-friendly state,” officials wrote.

Sununu told the Concord Monitor that because the state’s tax structure is so low already, the pitch does not include financial incentives in the form of tax breaks or subsidies.

 Ted Gatsas, mayor of neighboring Manchester, said in a statement to the Globe: “Manchester offers a lot of opportunity to the proposal and I believe that Amazon will see the value of the city’s resources, as well as the regions, when they evaluate the State of New Hampshire’s proposal in its entirety.”

For more info, click here, here, here, here, and here.

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Rhode Island

 Status: Submitted bid

 State officials said Thursday evening they had submitted a bid that includes sites in several locations: Providence, Pawtucket-Central Falls, East Providence, Warwick, North Kingstown, Richmond, and Woonsocket.

 “Our application package lays out the partnerships, business climate, quality of life, and incentives that make Rhode Island attractive — and make our proposal competitive,” said a statement from Rhode Island Commerce Secretary Stefan Pryor.

 Pryor said a key part of the bid was a collaboration among higher education institutions in the state for an initiative called, “Amazon Academy.” Pryor explained: “We envision Amazon employees obtaining the professional development and continuing education they need to advance Amazon’s goals through this initiative. The Academy will braid together offerings from Rhode Island’s colleges and universities and will serve as a one-stop-shop for Amazon employees to access programming that is tailored to the company.”

 Few additional details were disclosed. The state posted a website, www.riforamazon.us, but features of the site, including links to copies of the bid, were protected by a password as of Thursday evening. “We will not be publicly releasing the detailed materials that are subject to negotiation,” Pryor said.

 Prior to Thursday, two of the cities included in the state’s proposal, Pawtucket and neighboring Central Falls, had publicly pitched that Amazon build in a 160-acre area that straddles both communities and where a commuter rail station and transit hub is scheduled to open in 2020. Though officials there said they planned to submit that pitch through the state first so Rhode Island could send a unified bid to the company.

For more info, click here, here, here, and here.

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What about Vermont?

The list above doesn’t include any communities in one New England state: Vermont.

Rebecca Kelley, a spokeswoman for Vermont Governor Phil Scott, said via e-mail recently: “The state has not heard from any municipalities that they are considering or planning to bid, though I can’t say definitively that means none have or are.”

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Tim Logan, Jon Chesto, and Janelle Nanos of the Globe staff and Globe columnist Shirley Leung contributed to this report. Matt Rocheleau can be reached at matthew.rocheleau@globe.com. Follow him on Twitter @mrochele.