Metro

Authorities hunt Grinch who stole Christmas trees from Hadley farm

While Christmas tree theft might be a rarity in Hadley, it’s not unheard of. An untold number of evergreens vanish without a trace every winter.
Keith Srakocic/Associated Press
While Christmas tree theft might be a rarity in Hadley, it’s not unheard of. An untold number of evergreens vanish without a trace every winter.

Police are trying to track down the Grinch who stole $900 worth of Christmas trees from a farm in Hadley.

As of Tuesday, Hadley police were following up on potential leads in the hopes of cracking the case and finding the mastermind behind the holiday heist.

“A total of 17 Christmas trees were taken,” Detective Jesse Green said. “One of the trees was a 20-foot tree.”

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Green said the thefts occurred over about two weeks at Zaskey Christmas Tree Farm on Mount Warner Road. Given the number — and size — of the trees, police believe they were stolen at night when the business was closed.

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On Dec. 10, police turned to Facebook and asked for the public’s help in identifying the suspect — or suspects — responsible for the thefts, and encouraged anyone with information to contact the Hadley Police Department at 413-584-0883.

“We do have some information coming in,” Green said Tuesday. “We’re following up on it now.”

Hadley hasn’t seen a theft of so many Christmas trees before. “We haven’t had this happen,” Green said.

More recently, vandals struck a volunteer-run Christmas tree sale at Archbishop Williams High School in Braintree, which was discovered Dec. 1.

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Mike Parsons, one of the parent volunteers who runs the sale, said the mischief-makers threw wreaths around the lot and into the trees and pushed over wreath stands and stomped on them.

When the volunteers reopened the site the next day, six trees were missing, but four people showed up later in the week to pay for them — which is typical, Parsons wrote in an e-mail.

“Almost every day one or two trees will disappear, but usually someone will show up the next time we are open to tell us where they went and pay for them,” Parsons said.

Emily Sweeney can be reached at esweeney@globe.com.