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    Former Fenway Health doctor resigns medical license

    Dr. Harvey J. Makadon, in a statement, said he resigned because he has not treated patients since 2008 at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
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    Dr. Harvey J. Makadon, in a statement, said he resigned because he has not treated patients since 2008 at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

    Dr. Harvey J. Makadon, dismissed last year from Fenway Community Health Center for allegedly sexually harassing and bullying co-workers, has resigned his license to practice medicine, the state’s Board of Registration in Medicine said Friday.

    The board accepted Makadon’s resignation at a meeting Thursday, in what’s deemed a disciplinary action that permanently removes him from practicing medicine, according to a press release.

    Makadon, in a statement, said he resigned because he has not treated patients since 2008 at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, where he had a practice. “As I do not intend to practice, I did not see any need for a license, and did not see a reason to engage in an investigation of allegations to continue to keep my license,’’ he said.

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    Makadon, a Columbia University-educated physician, was affiliated with Beth Israel for most of his career and was a Harvard Medical School faculty member from 1980 until last month.

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    Makadon, 70, was first licensed in Massachusetts in 1979 and was a well-known doctor to gay men during the AIDS crisis, later coauthoring a textbook on how to provide effective health care to the LGBTQ community.

    But Makadon had another side, according to numerous people who worked with him, allegedly using his stature to make unwanted sexual advances on male co-workers, and to bully both male and female employees.

    The Globe reported in December that Fenway Health had kept Makadon as an employee at its research arm for four years after the first serious harassment complaint was filed against him in 2013. The health center’s chief executive also did not fire Makadon in 2015, despite an outside law firm’s explicit advice that he do so.

    Boston-based Fenway’s chief executive, Dr. Stephen L. Boswell, and board chairman Robert H. Hale both resigned under pressure within days of the revelations in the Globe story.

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    Makadon resigned from Fenway last March, after Hale was alerted to allegations against him. Still, Hale came under criticism from some in the Fenway community for having renewed Boswell’s contract — in spite of Boswell’s handling of the Makadon allegations, and failure to inform the board about them.

    At least three male Fenway employees reported unwanted touching by Makadon, including one who said the doctor put his hand down the back of his pants in an elevator. To another man, Fenway paid $75,000 to settle allegations of sexual harassment and bullying.

    The Globe also reported that three men from earlier in Makadon’s career had come forward with allegations of harassment and sexual advances. Makadon denied some of the allegations but apologized in other cases for making people feel uncomfortable.

    Beth Healy can be reached at beth.healy@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @HealyBeth.