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Tours of an oceanfront property benefit Children’s Hospital

HOUSE WITH A VIEW: Tour a 33,000-square-foot multifamily, luxury condominium on a stretch of ocean in Swampscott, and help Boston Children’s Hospital.

It is this year’s Boston Magazine Design Home.

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Beginning Sept. 12, the Design Home, The Concordia at 245 Humphrey St., opens its doors to the public for four weeks of tours.

The creation of design coordinators Jerry Rippetoe and Tony Sienicki of tj’s at the Sign of the Goose, developer Barry Turkanis, and Bruce Paradise of Paradise Construction, the house showcases products from the Greater Boston design community.

As design coordinators, Rippetoe and Sienicki aimed to combine timeless pieces and newer accents to evoke feelings of relaxation and luxury. The house also features jewel tones, to complement the water views.

In conjunction with the interior, architect Robert Zarelli designed the home to reflect the classic architectural elements of Swampscott’s turn-of-the-century seaside resorts.

The house is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays; and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 7. .

Tickets are $25, with all proceeds benefiting the Peabody location of Children’s Hospital.

Visit www.bostonmagazine.com/designhome.

A WORKADAY WORLD: An exhibit highlighting 150 years of work and the workforce in America, as well as prominent industries in Haverhill, is at the Buttonwoods Museum of the Haverhill Historical Society through Oct. 6.

“The Way We Worked” is a traveling exhibition of the Smithsonian Institution.

Adapted from an original exhibition developed by the National Archives and Records Administration , the exhibit traces changes that have affected the workforce and work environments, including the rapid growth of manufacturing and increasing use of technology.

It includes historical photographs, archival accounts of workers, film, audio, and interactive exhibits.

“We are very pleased to be able to bring ‘The Way We Worked’ to our area,” said Jan Williams, curator of the Buttonwoods Museum. “It allows us the opportunity to explore this fascinating aspect of our own region’s history, and we hope that it will inspire many to become even more involved in the cultural life of our community.”

An overlay exhibit looks at many of Haverhill’s local employers.

“The Way We Worked” is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, humanities councils across the nation, and host institutions.

Admission is $7; $5 for senior citizens; $3 for ages 7 to 17. Every Thursday, admission is free for senior citizens. Call 978-374-4626 or visit www.haverhillhistory.org .

PLUM LOCO: Historically, people have picked cranberries and beach plums on Plum Island. And, the activity continues today thanks to the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge .

Free permits for picking the fruit are available at the refuge from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.

A total of 50 permits are being issued, a number based on the abundance and quality of the fruit, and they are issued on a first–come, first-served basis. Collection season is through Oct. 31.

Call 978-465-5753 or visit www.fws.gov/refuge/parker_river .

WHO’S WHAT WHERE: Daisy Yiyou Wang is the new curator of Chinese and East Asian art at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem. She comes to the museum from the national museums of Asian Art at the Smithsonian Institution . Wang, who specializes in later Chinese art and Chinese contemporary art, recently won a Smithsonian Scholarly Studies Award for research focused on Chinese lacquer and on Charles Lang Freer, the pioneering American collector of Asian art. . . . ProEx Physical Therapy, which specializes in orthopedics, spine, and sports medicine, has some new staffers. Meaghan Arsenault of Methuen has joined the company as an exercise technician in the Haverhill location. John Smith of Waltham is a front desk specialist in Woburn. And Ryan Dolan of Strafford, N.H., has been named athletic trainer at Wilmington High School. His role is to respond to athletic injuries at the high school, providing on-site assessment and treatment. He works with Ed Harrison, athletics director at the high school, and all the coaching staff on an injury management plan. Dolan is also an exercise technician at ProEx in Woburn.

Items may be sent to wdkilleen@gmail.com.

Correction: Because of a reporting error, tour dates for the Boston Magazine Design House at 245 Humphrey St. in Swampscott were incomplete in an earlier version of this story. Tours will be held 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays, and Mondays and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 7.

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