South

BLOTTER TALES

Move over! Runaway cow!

Shutterstock / Dudarev Mikhail

It wasn’t exactly daylight when a bold bovine made its move in Stow.

Every day, police officers respond to reports of all sorts of events and non-events, most of which never make the news. Here is a sampling of lesser-known — but no less noteworthy — incidents from police log books (a.k.a. blotters) in our suburbs.

ON THE MOOOOOOVE

At 1:37 a.m. March 9, a cow was reported wandering the streets of Stow. A caller told police that the animal was seen on South Acton Road heading toward Acton. Officers searched, and eventually located the runaway a half-hour after the initial call near Tuttle Lane. Police then called and left a message for the cow’s owner, and just before 3 a.m., they reported that the pair had been reunited.

WELL, AT LEAST ITS SPILL WAS WELL-CUSHIONED

Just before 9 a.m. March 2, a Norwood police officer came upon a giant roll of bubble wrap obstructing Route 1 in front of the Lunch Box Deli. This was no small matter, either — in fact, the roll was so big it couldn’t fit in the cruiser. Left with no other option, the officer moved the hefty roll to the side of the road temporarily, and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation was notified.

THESE LADIES WERE THROWING DARTS

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At 8:43 p.m. March 10, police were called to quell a disturbance at Buddha’s Tavern on Washington Street in Peabody. A woman had called to report that another female customer was “playing darts aggressively” and may have been trying to hurt her. Arriving officers determined it was a verbal argument between the two, and suggested that they go their separate ways. The manager reinforced that notion by asking the woman who’d called police to leave the establishment for the night. Officers gave one of the women, though it’s unclear which, a ride to Dunkin’ Donuts to wait for someone who was to pick her up — and perhaps to have a cup of java while doing so.

BY ANY MEANS NECESSARY

At 1:54 a.m. March 4, Melrose police received a call from a man at Melrose-Wakefield Hospital — it’s unclear if he was a patient there — with an unusual request. He asked to placed under arrest so he could spend the night in a jail cell. When police told him no, that wouldn’t be happening, he threatened to commit crimes until he was arrested. Police continued to speak to the guy, who ultimately, though reluctantly, came to terms with the fact that he had to stay at the hospital until the morning.

I SAW THE LIGHT

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At 5:37 p.m. Feb. 8, Burlington police received a report of a “a suspicious white package with wires hanging out of it” that was spotted at the intersection of Mall Road and Middlesex Turnpike. The officer dispatched to the scene located the mysterious contraption — a broken street light.

WHEN ICE CREAM ISN’T A TREAT

At 9:24 p.m. Feb. 24, a woman called Saugus police to report that someone had thrown ice cream all over her vehicle. An officer was dispatched to Spring Street and observed that, yes indeed, an ice cream cone had landed on her ride. There was no damage to speak of, but a report was taken to document the incident.

THE HALLS WERE ALIVE WITH THE SOUND OF MUSIC

Citizens will often call police to complain when their neighbors are being loud, but here’s a case where the tables were somewhat turned. It all started at 11:11 p.m. Feb. 25, when a resident of an apartment on West Walnut Street in Milford called police to complain that a female neighbor was playing loud music. A few minutes later, apparently after getting the message that folks were complaining, the music-lover herself called the police department’s business line to ask why she couldn’t play her music. Just before 11:30, she called police again, this time on the 911 line intended for emergencies, to again ask why she couldn’t play music at the volume of her choosing. At this point, police suspected she might be intoxicated, and an officer was dispatched to her home, to no avail, as no one answered the door. Clearly, its occupant preferred phone communication, because not long before midnight, she made her third and final call to police. Her neighbors were no longer pestering her about the volume of her music, she announced, but that they did so in the first place? That, she said, was upsetting.

Emily Sweeney can be reached at esweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.
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