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BLOTTER TALES

These shoes were made for, uh, collecting

24zoblotter - Wareham police executed a search warrant Sept. 11 and seized over 260 pairs of menÕs and womenÕs sneakers and shoes, estimated to be worth approximately $50,000. (Wareham Police Department)
Wareham Police Department
Wareham police executed a search warrant at a home Sept. 11 and seized more than 260 pairs of sneakers and shoes worth about $50,000.

Every day, police officers respond to reports of all sorts of events and nonevents, most of which never make the news. Here is a sampling of lesser-known — but no less noteworthy — incidents from police log books (a.k.a. blotters) in our suburbs.

NOT EXACTLY IMELDA MARCOS, BUT STILL

Police in Wareham came away with more than they bargained for when they executed a search warrant at a home on Cranberry Lane Sept. 11. When detectives showed up at the door of the home, where heroin was allegedly being sold, a 28-year-old woman tried to run away and a 31-year-old man put up a struggle while trying to hide some drugs, police said. With the help of K-9 units from the Barnstable County Sheriff’s Department and the Massachusetts Department of Correction, police recovered “a large amount of narcotics” from the home, including over 38 grams of heroin, 5 grams of cocaine, Suboxone strips, and approximately 40 unidentified pills, along with approximately $4,500 in cash, and — get this — a footwear collection valued at $50,000. Police reported that most of the 260 pairs of men’s and women’s sneakers and shoes appeared to be brand new or collector’s items. Police said the search warrant was the culmination of a weeks-long investigation into alleged drug dealing at that address. The duo had been arrested in May and charged with trafficking in over 300 grams of heroin, and had been out on bail. They now face more drug charges, and the man was also charged with resisting arrest.

SHHHHHHH . . .

It’s one thing to get an early start on a loved one’s birthday, but it’s best to be civilized about it, no? Someone in Marblehead apparently didn’t get the memo. In the wee hours of Aug. 14 — 3:56 a.m., to be precise — police received a complaint about a “a person loudly singing ‘Happy Birthday’ ” in a house near the fire station on Ocean Avenue. An officer spoke to the homeowner, and peace was soon restored. And, hey, not every birthday is noted by the local constabulary. Just two mornings later in Bridgewater, at 4:52 a.m., police received a noise complaint from a resident who reported that a woman was walking around her condo complex “with a boom box playing loud music.” A second complaint came in roughly a half-hour later, this time reporting that the woman was outside “yelling to the neighbors to shut the windows and that she can do what she wants.” Arriving officers were told it wasn’t the first time the woman had gotten loud; no further action was noted in the police log.

CIRCLES OF SUSPICION

At 7:06 p.m. Aug. 6, Peabody police were told a suspicious red sedan was continuously circling around Forenza Road and the surrounding neighborhood. An officer was dispatched and soon discovered a very innocent explanation: The person behind the wheel had a learner’s permit and was being taught how to drive. The licensed driver soon stepped into the driver’s seat, and teacher and student headed on their way.

WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE

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On the afternoon of Sept. 12, a man walked into the Bellingham police station to report that he had been keeping some tools at his friend’s house and had just discovered that they were being sold online.

A LONG DAY’S NIGHT

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Talk about a bad way to cap off a long day at work. At 9:22 p.m. Aug. 27, Milford police heard from an employee of the Big Y supermarket on Route 109, who reported being locked inside the store, unable to get out. Police managed to get in touch with someone with a key; within minutes, the trapped worker was homeward bound.

Emily Sweeney can be reached at esweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.