South

BLOTTER TALES

Rounding up all God’s creatures

Gabrielle Stubbert
On the morning of Oct. 11, Northborough police received a report of a “herd of goats running amok.”

Every day, police officers respond to reports of all sorts of events and non-events, most of which never make the news. Here is a sampling of lesser-known — but no less noteworthy — incidents from police log books (a.k.a. blotters) in our suburbs.

EVERY CRAWLING THING THAT MOVES ON THE GROUND

That ficitious Boston police officer might have gotten all the glory for helping Mack, Quack and company make it to the Public Garden back in the day, but his modern-day colleagues in these parts are no slouches when it comes to aiding all God’s creatures. On July 27 in West Bridgewater, for example, an officer helped free two baby raccoons stuck in a dumpster on North Main Street. On the evening of Aug. 10, a Northborough officer helped a turtle in the middle of Ridge Road get to the other side. Just before 4 a.m. Sept. 11, Stow police received a call reporting that cows from Pilot Grove Farm were loose. The owner of the cows was notified and took control of the wayward cattle. And on the morning of Oct. 11, Northborough police received a report of a “herd of goats running amok” on Centre Drive. In this case, by the time officers got to the area, they found that the goats had already been rounded up.

WATCH THE PLAIN CLOTHES

When you’re an officer looking for honest answers, sometimes it helps if you’re not wearing your uniform. Case in point: At 1:35 a.m. Sept. 2, a group of plainclothes police officers working on Lafayette Street in Salem noticed two men hanging out by St. Joseph’s Church. When the officers approached the pair and asked what they were up to, the older man said, “just smokin’ a little crack, man,” and handed one of the officers a pipe. The men, aged 36 and 56, were arrested and charged with possession of illegal drugs.

BUT JOHNNY CASH HAS LEFT THE BUILDING

At 12:43 a.m. Sept. 24, Bridgewater police received a 911 call from a resident who said that a “man dressed in all black” came to his front door and was looking in the windows of his home. Police soon reported that the seemingly sketchy guy was merely a Domino’s driver attempting to deliver a pizza.

WHY IS THAT WASCALLY WABBIT?

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At 3:10 a.m. Sept. 10, Wareham police responded to a motion-activated burglar alarm that went off at Atlantic Boats Inc. on Cranberry Highway. Officers checked out the place and everything appeared to be secure. Officers reported that footage from the security cameras didn’t show anything unusual, but that it was possible that a rabbit had set off the alarm.

NO CAUSE FOR ALARM

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The US Department of Homeland Security’s “If you see something, say something” slogan is a mantra for perilous times, and police are hardly complaining that most sightings of suspicious objects don’t yield anything dangerous. Such was the case in Hingham Sept. 8, when an caller notified police a taped-up cardboard box was sitting in the road outside the upscale Derby Street Shoppes. The dangerous contents of this out-of-place box? Packing material. A similar incident occurred in Marblehead on Aug. 4, when a caller told police that she’d seen a white bag or package of some sort near the base of a pole on Atlantic Avenue and “felt it was suspicious because it has been there for a few hours.” Well, maybe a little odoriferous: Officers soon determined it was a bag of leftover food.

Emily Sweeney can be reached at esweeney@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @emilysweeney.