Franklin

Mobile food pantries hit the road

Franklin Food Pantry director of operations Linda Sottile, left, and volunteers David Sottile, Patricia Crowley, and Cindy Fontaine, unloaded food from the mobile food pantry truck at the Franklin Senior Center on June 23, 2014.

Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

The Franklin Food Pantry has launched a mobile food pantry to deliver offerings to residents where they already live and gather.

CVS bid to curb store is on hold in Hopkinton

Hopkinton Drug, the town’s only pharmacy, has filed a federal lawsuit that claims pharmacy giant CVS Caremark is trying to damage its business.

Entomologist Michael Veit with a bee he found in a field near his home.

Winslow Townson for the Boston Globe

Pepperell entomologist abuzz about bees

Black flies. Bees. Dragonflies. If you’ve ever shooed them away from your picnic, chances are entomologist Michael Veit has spent time studying them.

For a young cancer survivor, another challenge tackled

Jack Manning, 16, represents everything that the Pan-Mass Challenge stands for.

Alexandra Wolf, shown competing for Stony Brook University, will teach a class in ballroom dancing Monday in Bellingham.

Arts

Determined to keep dancing, she found a different beat

Alexandra Wolf of Milford has been competing as a ballroom dancer for two years, and now she returns to the dance program of her childhood.

South

Two strikingly different exterior photos were taken by homeowner Jacinta Murphy. At top, the house in October 2013 as renovations began in earnest and (center) the house as it appeared earlier this month.

New look for an old Norwood landmark

Owner Jacinta Murphy and her fiancé, Jim Murray, restored the Victorian clapboard structure to much of its original late 19th-century glory.

Interactive Graphic

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/06/11/BostonGlobe.com/Regional/Images/2013-03-21T021641Z_01_PXP452_RTRMDNP_3_BOXING-BRAIN.jpg High school concussions

See the number of concussions reported by area high schools with a sortable table.

Globe West Briefs

Millis

Beat the heat at free events

Residents have several options for beating the heat for free, including one last summer concert, summer movies, and a “splash day’’ at Town Park. The It Is What It Is band will play at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at the historic Millis Bandstand, behind the Veterans Memorial Building, in the final installment of the summer concert series. Family-friendly movies will be shown from 4 to 6 p.m. every Wednesday until Aug. 27 in the Roche Bros. Community Room at the Millis Public Library at 961 Main St. Free matinees for adults will also be shown at the library at 1 p.m. on Fridays through September. For more information, call 508-376-8282 or visit www.millislibrary.org . Finally, there’s the Summer Splash Day from 1 to 3 p.m. on Aug. 6 at Town Park (the rain date is Aug. 13). The event is free, but donations of canned goods will be collected for the Millis Food Pantry.

Millis

Donate food and avoid library fines

The Millis Public Library is conducting its semiannual “Food for Fines” amnesty program through Thursday. The program allows patrons to donate nonperishable food items and household supplies to the Millis Food Pantry to erase late fees. The library is asking participants to alert a staff member before they place donations in collection boxes at the parking lot entrance. Only unexpired items will be accepted, and food donations will not cover the replacement costs of lost or damaged materials. The pantry’s organizers report that the greatest need for donations is in the summer, when families in need of assistance cannot rely on free or reduced-price school meals. Approximately 22 percent of middle and high school students participate in the school lunch program, and 90 families are enrolled in the food pantry, officials said. For more information, call library director Tricia Perry at 508-376-8282.

Marlborough

Library seeks student volunteers

The Marlborough Public Library is looking for students in grades 6 through 12 who are organized, neat, and creative. The volunteer roles include keeping things in order, making spaces look pleasing to the eye, replacing books in the stacks, adding genre stickers to book spines, and tracking down series books, officials said. Interested youths should fill out a teen volunteer form, available at the library and on its website, www.marlboroughpubliclibrary.org, to sign up for training sessions being held on the next two Mondays from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more information, contact teen librarian Jess Bacon at 508-624-6903 or jbacon@cwmars.org.

Watertown

Work begins on riverside park, “Braille trail”

State and local leaders broke ground last week on a nearly $1.4 million project to restore a riverside park and create a “Braille trail” for the visually impaired. The mile-long greenway extends along Charles River Road between Watertown Square and the Watertown Yacht Club, and the work will include improvements to the riverbank, nearby pathways and landscaping, according to state officials. The state’s Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs has teamed up with the Perkins School for the Blind to install a guide wire, and visual text and graphic descriptions in Braille along the trail. There will also be a sensory garden featuring benches, stone walls, and a canoe-like boat. Pedestrian signals will be erected to aid safe crossing at Charles River Road and Irving Street. For more information on the project, visit www.mass.gov/eea.