Menino's legacy

A look back at the five-term tenure of Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino.

Letting go is hard for Menino as memories pour in

Everywhere he looks, Thomas Menino sees the imprint of his 20-year mayoralty. He leaves with many points of pride and precious few regrets.

For 20 years, Mayor Thomas M. Menino has run the city from the chair at the head of this 10-foot mahogany table with a commanding view of Faneuil Hall. On the morning he announced to the world he would not be seeking another term in office, he sat at his usual spot and spoke with his Cabinet chiefs and top officials, including Peter Meade, William Sinnott, Edward J. Davis, and Brian Swett. Later, they gave him a standing ovation, and Menino remained seated, his head down, his chin resting on his hands.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

Mayor Menino attended the celebration of the listing of the Roslindale Substation to the National Register of Historic Places. The hand shakes and hugs went on long after the ceremonial duties ended.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

As the months, weeks, and days rolled by, closer to he end of his 20-year run as the mayor of Boston, the applause grew louder and longer as Menino attended events in the city. Here he visited more than 500 Boston seniors for the Central Boston Elderly Services 2d Annual United for Elders Summer Swing at the Shelburne Community Center in Roxbury.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino has spent most of his time as mayor sitting in the front passenger seat of city vehicle driven by a plainclothes police officer.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Francine (who would not provide her last name), a lifelong North End resident, embraced Mayor Menino after the St. Anthony's Feast outdoor Mass in the North End.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

One of the things the mayor is most proud of is Camp Harbor View — the camp for Boston kids he helped to create. He visited the camp weekly in the summer. Omanni Hairston, 11,  confided that she was having trouble in school and she asked if he could he help her. He gave her his phone number and told her to call him.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino talked with his emotional granddaughter Olivia Fenton in his office after he informed his staff he would not be seeking another term as mayor. When she broke into tears, he brought her close for a hug.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

When he took office, he had no grandchildren — now he has six. The bottom shelf in his office is filled with toys that his grandkids played with when they visited him when they were younger. His bocce trophies occupy the top shelf.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Dorothy

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino spent his last Halloween as mayor as he always does — on his front porch giving out candy to neighborhood children. He greeted 4-year-old Anna St. Coeur.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino voted at the Roosevelt School Lower Campus. For the first time in 20 years, his name was not on the ballot.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

 “They will need a crane to get me out of this chair,” said Menino, about sitting at his long table. Here he is seen through his office window from Faneuil Hall with a Christmas light covered tree in the foreground.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Menino exited his vehicle before casting his ballot on election day.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Menino walked to the podium at the 10th Anniversary Celebration of the Boston Women's Memorial on Commonwealth Avenue.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

On Menino's last full day before Boston elected a new mayor, he showed emotion as a park was named for him in Charlestown.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino watched the election results come in with Mike Monahan of IBEW, right.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Menino sat momentarily after calling the new mayor-elect following Martin Walsh’s election victory.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Menino was applauded and photographed as he greeted workers at St. Francis House on Thanksgiving.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

In the mayor's office is a desk Menino never sits at — to the rear of him in this photo. It's used more like a shelf.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

The most significant challenge of Menino's last term has been his own body. In the days after the last election, he tore a ligament in his knee. Then he endured an onslaught of maladies including broken vertebra in his back, infection in his elbow, surgery on both knees, a diabetes diagnosis, broken foot, broken toe, eyelid surgery, cataracts in both eyes. Here he got help in rehab from physical therapist James Camarinos.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

Menino was startled after receiving a hard slap on the back from friend John Riley of West Roxbury. Riley and Menino are regulars at Cristelle's Restaurant on Sundays.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

The Hyde Park YMCA was renamed for Mayor Thomas M Menino. From left, the mayor, his wife, Angela, Eileen and Jack Connors, Stacey Lucchino.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

The mayor and his wife, Angela, viewed the just unveiled sign on the outside of the Hyde Park YMCA.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino gave his final major address at the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce on Dec. 10.

Yoon S. Byun/Globe staff

As mayor, Thomas M. Menino has had a profound impact on downtown construction.

Menino leaves behind legacy of development

As mayor, Thomas M. Menino played a central role in rebuilding a city that is now among the world’s top markets for real estate investment.

Boston’s Mayor Menino makes 5th term his last

Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s decision ended the reign of a former insurance salesman who became one of the most powerful figures in Boston history.

”I miss hitting every event, ribbon cutting, new homeowner dinner,” Menino said as he announced he will not seek reelection in Faneuil Hall.

Bill Sikes/AP Photo

”I miss hitting every event, ribbon cutting, new homeowner dinner,” Menino said as he announced he will not seek reelection in Faneuil Hall.

“Over the past few months, I have been weighing my own place in Boston’s bright future,” Menino said.

Barry Chin/Globe Staff

“Over the past few months, I have been weighing my own place in Boston’s bright future,” Menino said.

Menino was hospitalized for eight weeks late last year, and said his health was holding him back from his frequent visits to neighborhoods.

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Menino was hospitalized for eight weeks late last year, and said his health was holding him back from his frequent visits to neighborhoods.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino with his wife, Angela, to his right.

Barry Chin/Globe Staff

Mayor Thomas M. Menino with his wife, Angela, to his right.

Audience members reacted to Menino’s announcement that he will not run.

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Audience members reacted to Menino’s announcement that he will not run.

Governor Deval Patrick, Attorney General Martha Coakley, and US Representatives Michael E. Capuano and Stephen Lynch applauded Menino.

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Governor Deval Patrick, Attorney General Martha Coakley, and US Representatives Michael E. Capuano and Stephen Lynch applauded Menino.

Menino said he “will be very proud if I have changed our city in some ways that last.”

Bill Greene/Globe Staff

Menino said he “will be very proud if I have changed our city in some ways that last.”

Menino greeted an old friend at Faneuil Hall, Jerry Quinn, former owner of The Kells in Allston.

Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

Menino greeted an old friend at Faneuil Hall, Jerry Quinn, former owner of The Kells in Allston.

Menino and his wife, Angela Menino, arrived at Faneuil Hall for his official announcement.

Matthew J. Lee/Globe Staff

Menino and his wife, Angela Menino, arrived at Faneuil Hall for his official announcement.

“Boston’s neighborhoods are thriving as they never have,” Menino said.

Bill Sikes/AP Photo

“Boston’s neighborhoods are thriving as they never have,” Menino said.

Menino spoke with his emotional granddaughter Olivia Fenton in his office after he informed his staff of his decision.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe staff

Menino spoke with his emotional granddaughter Olivia Fenton in his office after he informed his staff of his decision.

Menino (left) let staff members, including the police commissioner and the corporation counsel, know he will not seek reelection.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

Menino (left) let staff members, including the police commissioner and the corporation counsel, know he will not seek reelection.

Menino left his Hyde Park home Thursday morning.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

Menino left his Hyde Park home Thursday morning.

Mayor Thomas M. Menino spoke to reporters before leaving his Hyde Park home.

Suzanne Kreiter/Globe Staff

Mayor Thomas M. Menino spoke to reporters before leaving his Hyde Park home.

How Mayor Menino decided it was time to go

After his own appraisal of his physical limitations, 70-year-old Thomas M. Menino decided two weeks ago he couldn’t continue to run Boston the way he wanted.

Lawrence Harmon

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/30/BostonGlobe.com/EditorialOpinion/Images/Lawrence_Harmon-473.jpg The urban mechanic: What are the nuts and bolts of Menino’s legacy?

Mayoral hopefuls would have to be asleep to miss Thomas Menino’s well-known formula for success, however other strategies aren’t so obvious.

Kevin Cullen

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/28/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Kevin_Cullen_150px-5173.jpg Menino a Boston guy through and through

Tommy Menino was our mayor for so long it’s hard to imagine a time when he won’t be. But that’s another nine months away.

SCOT LEHIGH

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/29/BostonGlobe.com/EditorialOpinion/Images/Scot_Lehigh_150px-472.jpg Lessons from an era

In the era ahead, the trick for Boston — for its mayoral candidates and its voters — will be to learn from the entire Thomas M. Menino experience.

Brian McGrory

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2012/11/16/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/Brian_McGrory_150px-3710--150x150.jpg For Menino, it’s been a journey like no other

After 20 years and a record-setting five mayoral terms, Mayor Menino will stand at a podium in Faneuil Hall Thursday and announce he will not run again.

Menino’s legacy

Boston’s urban mechanic mayor moves on

Mayor Menino used his power to orchestrate every last detail of the city — from the top of a tower in the Back Bay to a rattling pothole in Roslindale.

Photo gallery

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/28/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/28meninoslider%20(10)--90x90.jpg Thomas M. Menino through the years

Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino, from his days as a Hyde Park city councilor to his 20th year as mayor.

Mayor Menino’s exit stirs uncertainty among business leaders

In a city where everyone in the business community knew where they stood, no one is quite sure what happens next.

The Podium

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/29/BostonGlobe.com/EditorialOpinion/Images/178438-178438.jpg Menino blazed trail on protecting historic buildings

A large part of the mayor’s legacy will be the demolitions Boston didn’t see, writes author and former Menino adviser Carter Wilkie.

THE PEOPLE SPEAK

//c.o0bg.com/rf/image_90x90/Boston/2011-2020/2013/03/28/BostonGlobe.com/Metro/Images/meninoreax_02-001.jpg Bostonians reflect on Menino’s tenure

From Mattapan to East Boston, Bostonians credited their five-term mayor with fixing more than potholes over the past 20 years.

Diverse Legacy

Blacks appreciate Menino, yearn for more

The mayor forged a connection with many in Boston’s black community, although high approval rates were tempered by feelings of limited progress.

BOSTON’S SCHOOLS

Menino pushed to be the ‘education mayor’

As Menino prepares to leave office, he can point to an array of accomplishments, even though problems remain.

Menino’s legacy

Menino long championed public health

During his two decades as mayor, Thomas M. Menino has led some of the most successful campaigns to improve the health of Bostonians.

Menino's Boston

March 26, 2013

In his annual speech at the annual luncheon of the Boston Municipal Research Bureau, Mayor Thomas M. Menino talked of the vibrant state of the city.

Mayor Menino spotlights Boston’s growth

In a speech to business and civic leaders, a determined and jovial Mayor Menino described Boston as a city on the rise.

Opinion and analysis

Kevin Cullen

Mayor Thomas Menino (left) let his staff know that he will not seek reelection.

Menino a Boston guy through and through

Tommy Menino was our mayor for so long it’s hard to imagine a time when he won’t be. But that’s another nine months away.